HEALTH NEWS SUMMARIES

17 Apr, 2012

First Lady opens sh6b health centre, New vision Jan 22, 2013 by Vision Reporter

The First Lady and Karamoja Affairs Minister, Janet Museveni, has commissioned the AIDS Healthcare Foundation (AHF) Health Centre and Commercial Building complex in Lukaya, Kalungu district valued at sh6.1b.The health facility run by the Uganda Cares Project is expected to attend to 300 patients on a daily basis. It is composed of a large waiting room that can house 100 patients at a time, six consultation rooms, three counselling rooms and three isolation rooms. It also has a pharmacy, dispensary room, a 10-bed observation room, laboratories, archives and a conference room, staff room, eight offices plus eight washrooms for staff and ten for patients. In addition to the health facility, the complex also has apartments, restaurants, banking halls, conference halls and shops. Jane said it is shaming that the condom and circumcision, which are key components in the struggle against HIV / AIDS, are instead used by some to mock the struggle. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/639089-first-lady-opens-sh6b-health-centre.html

Groundbreaking vaccine research reveals more clues about HIV, plus news Global HIV/AIDS news and analysis 16 January 2013

The only HIV vaccine trial to achieve moderate success took place four years ago, yet it continues to reveal new information about the virus and renew hopes for a future vaccine. In 2009, researchers released the findings of a six-year HIV vaccine study carried out in Thailand known as RV144. Conducted among 16,000 HIV-negative men and women, the trial found that HIV infection rates were 31 percent lower among participants who received the vaccine than in those who had not. It was an encouraging protection rate, but short of the minimum 50 percent prevention rate required to slow the epidemic, which afflicts an estimated 34 million people worldwide, according to researchers at Duke University in the US. The research could change the way future HIV vaccines are designed.

How do we deal with man-made malaria resistance? IPP Media 20th January 2013 by a Guardian Correspondent

Contrary to recent pronouncements by anti-malaria campaigners that the disease was on decline, the reverse appears to be true. What is more: a more dangerous trend appears to have set in -- the arrival on the scene of fake malaria drugs. It is increasingly becoming normal these days to hear cases of resistant to malaria treatment, a development that has led to increased health costs. And because most of the anti-malaria tablets have increasingly become ineffective as the first line of malaria treatment, more and more malaria patients are turning to the more expensive form of treatment -- injections. And the question here is how many Tanzanians can afford the full dose of anti-malaria injections, the minimum cost of which is around 30,000/-? According to one source, one of the best ways of finding out whether a given anti-malaria drug was genuine or fake lies in its pricing. For instance, most pharmacies in Dar es Salaam sell artequine between 12,000/- and 15,000/- but a drug store at Namanga which carters for expatriates, mostly whites, sells the same drug at 22,000/- and the reason given by the staff at the pharmacy is that their artequine and other drugs they sell at the pharmacy are genuine. Read more at: http://www.ippmedia.com/frontend/index.php?l=50322

The Struggle to Keep the Children Alive 18 January 2013 by Sadab Kitata Kaaya,

HIV infections could outstrip access to antiretroviral enrolment by twofold Sandra Asiimwe was just a baby when her parents died from Aids. But 10 years later she lives, thanks, in part, to medical advances in treating HIV/Aids, and the care of her elderly grandmother. Two years after her parents' death, Asiimwe's grandmother took her to an outreach clinic run by Kitovu Mobile Aids Organization, one of the pioneer HIV/Aids care organizations in the sub-region, where she tested HIV-positive and was enrolled on the Antiretroviral (ART) programme. Asiimwe's story left many in her audience at last year's World Aids day celebrations in Kasensero in tears. After first attaining 81% coverage of prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) in 2009, the statistics have dropped drastically. Although the PMTCT programme was tested and designed in Uganda, an estimated 25,000 Ugandan babies are born HIV-positive every year. The Permanent Secretary in the ministry of Health, Dr Asuman Lukwago said that PMTCT is available at most health centre."Many of them don't go to established health facilities for antenatal care, and prefer [using] traditional birth attendants who can't handle such a programme [PMTCT], but we are trying to increase their attendance of antenatal clinics so they can access the service," Dr Lukwago told The Observer. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201301180101.html

Gum Disease More Dangerous in Women, The New vision 20 January 2013

Oral health has long been linked with other health problems, but experts find this link more prominent among women. Gum disease is a bacterial infection of the gums which can enter the blood stream and cause other problems in the body. It can be a risk factor for developing diabetes, heart disease, stroke and respiratory problems. According to a 2000 report by the American Academy of Periodontology, "Pregnant women who have gum disease may be more likely to have a baby born too early or too small. Gum disease may also trigger increased levels of biological fluids that induce labour. Gum disease can exist unattended to because it can be a painless condition that many women may ignore. Brushing and flossing daily mitigates gum disease and all the possible negative effects it could. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201301210458.html

Diabetics risk health to be thin, Fri, 18 Jan 2013 8:58

Young diabetic women are so terrified of gaining weight that they're risking their lives by skipping their insulin jabs, recent investigation has revealed. Type 1 diabetic women between the ages of 15 to 30 are at risk of falling prey to a new image disorder which risks their health and could make them gravely ill. Known as diabulemia, the condition is defined when sufferers avoid giving themselves their essential insulin shots to prevent them from picking up weight – a side-effect of taking insulin. If left untreated, it can result in disastrous or fatal consequences. Experts warn that this problem is becoming more widespread. Organisations such as Diabetics with Eating Disorders are now campaigning for the condition (officially known as Eating Disorder-Diabetes Mellitus Type 1) to become medically recognised and proper treatment provided for diabulemics. When this happens, highly acidic by-products known as ketones are produced that are very toxic to the body and which can cause major complications such as blindness and kidney failure. The risk of infertility and digestive problems increases greatly too. Read more at: http://lifestyle.iafrica.com/wellness/837469.html

Disclosing HIV status can address reckless behaviour-Staff Writer Thursday, 17 January 2013

MoH clears the air on status disclosure in health bill When defending the controversial new health bill on Tuesday, the Deputy Permanent Secretary in the Ministry of Health, Shanaaz El-Halabi said that disclosure of an individual's HIV status is meant to address reckless behaviour that puts other members of society at risk. Should it happen that the new health bill is approved as it is, HIV persons will be expected by law to disclose their HIV status to those that they are likely to infect, being their sexual partners and caregivers. "The bill recognises that medical practitioners, after allowing a patient reasonable opportunity may after seeking a second opinion of another practitioner be allowed to disclose a patient's status. It should be understood that restrictions on movement where it has been determined that public health will be at risk, is not limited to HIV infected people only,".  According to El-Halabi, the bill has not been deferred but will continue at committee stage when parliament resumes. Read more at: http://www.mmegi.bw/index.php?sid=1&aid=331&dir=2013/January/Thursday17

Health activists oppose industrial property bill, The Independent Saturday, 08 December 2012 13:08 by Joan Akello

Coalition for Health Promotion & Social Development (HEPS Uganda) with funding from Oxfam-HPAF, in partnership with AIDS Health Care Foundation (AHF) together with Uganda Coalition on Access to Essential Medicines partners want Model Provisions to promote Access to Affordable Medicines incorporated in the bill. However, activists say the bill, 2009 is TRIPS-plus; it goes over and above the minimum required standards. It makes it harder for Generic Medicines to enter the market by imposing strict border measures not required by TRIPS Flexibilities on Public Health. “TRIPS-Plus” policies have an impact on the prices of medicines. Without generics, the People living with HIV/AIDS in Uganda today would not have Access to ARVS because they rely on these medicines to keep alive and healthy. Akiror said, “To make sure that in future Ugandans can afford newer and better medicines, delete the TRIPS-Plus provisions for TRIPS Flexibilities like Compulsory Licensing, Parallel Importation, Higher Patent Standards to be utilised.” MPS, you are not compelled to provide ‘more Extensive IPR Protection because TRIPS Art.1.1 states; “…Members may, but shall not be obliged to, implement in their law more extensive protection than is required by this Agreement…” Akiror says this provision undermines access to medicines in Uganda. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/638245-ugandan-applicants-sought-for-health-fellowship-in-us.html

For a child, the first 1,000 days matter a lot, Newvision Jan 19, 2013

A mother from Sironko with her malnourished child at the Mbale nutrition clinic

New vision Two years old is what one would assume, at the first glance. However, the size of his feet, hands and head give him away. Alfajiri Muzamiru is four years. But he could pass for a two-year-old. He is way too short and small for his age, hence stunted. He is among the 26 million stunted children in eastern and southern Africa. About 10 million of those are in East Africa, according to Noel Marie Zagre, the regional nutritional advisor, UNICEF East and Southern Africa.

Owing to its prevalence, stunting was a focus of discussion at last year’s commemoration of the Africa Day for Food (ADFNS) and Nutrition Security, held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/639023-for-a-child-the-first-1-000-days-matter-a-lot.html

Pregnant HIV-positive mums will get free ARVs Nov 30, 2012 Newvision by Anne Mugisa and Paul Kiwuuwa

All pregnant women will get free anti-retroviral (ARV) drugs to stop the transmission of the HIV virus to the unborn babies, the Ministry of Health has said. The babies will also be put on ARVs until they are tested for the virus at two months. Administration of ARVs will, according to the ministry, be carried out irrespective of the recipients’ CD4 level. This new programme has the potential to ensure that children are no longer born with HIV. But, it can only work if stakeholders co-operate,” read the statement. However, it was also noted that more HIV-positive people in Uganda now live longer because of the availability of ARVs and this number feeds into the new infections to increase the overall national prevalence rate. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/637736-pregnant-hiv-positive-mums-will-get-free-arvs-gov-t.html

Church attacked for de-campaigning condom Newvision, December 04, 2012 by Caleb Bahikaho The Rukungiri municipality Member of Parliament, Rolland Mugume Kaginda has lashed out at religious leaders for not supporting condom use saying it was one of the major reasons HIV/AIDS infection was on the increase. Religious leaders should come out and tell people to use condoms," he said. Mugume said this while officiating at the AIDS Day commemoration in Rukungiri district held at Rukungiri main stadium Mugume said the church has been decampaigning condom use, and has led to the increased number of people infected with the scourge. He also urged men to go for safe male circumcision to reduce on chances of getting the disease. He also lamented lack of a district hospital which he said has caused loss of many lives as most of the HIV/AIDS patients cannot manage charges in private hospitals. He added that efforts by the district council to give a top up of sh500,000 to doctors who wish to work in Rukungiri have not yielded any fruits as no applications are received whenever they advertise for those jobs. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/637835-church-attacked-for-de-campaigning-condom-use.html

Taking good care of your health at work Daily Monitor, Thurseday 29th November by Prisca Aine

“I do not have time to work out, I am caught in between delivering my daily work targets and at the end of the day, I am beyond exhausted, all I want to do is shower, eat and sleep,” says Julie Namara, an administrator at a company in Kampala. Dr Kaddu Mukasa, a specialist in non-communicable diseases (NCD), says while some NCDs take long without detection, they can be avoided through regular exercises and a dietary watch. Diseases like diabetes, hypertension, cancers, arthritis, obesity and cardiovascular diseases are slowly eating their way into our society, NCDs share common risk factors like an unhealthy diet, smoking, excessive alcohol use and physical inactivity,” Dr Mukasa warns. Dr Mukasa says, “We can all change our routine. Our health is the most important thing that we should guard. Read more at: http://www.monitor.co.ug/Magazines/Health---Living/Taking-good-care-of-your-health-at-work/-/689846/1632338/-/6ron74z/-/index.html

Clait nurses strike enters its second day, The Times of Israel, December 4th 2012 by Gabe Fisher Negotiations between striking nurses, the Finance Ministry and labor union officials continued on Tuesday, as the open-ended strike declared  by nurses employed by Clalit Health Services entered its second day. Clalit runs a network of 14 hospitals and some 1,300 primary care clinics throughout Israel, as well as a network of dental clinics and pharmacies. Joining the Clalit strikers are nurses employed by Tipat Halav, which provides maternal and child health services in state-sponsored clinics throughout the country. As a result, non-crucial services will be limited in all Clalit hospitals, which will be operating with a bare bones Shabbat staff. “Even after negotiations that lasted 6.5 hours, the nurses union insisted on going ahead with a strike that is illegal and unjustified. The ministry added that salary hikes would not solve the manpower crisis, citing that 116 nursing positions, created in a March agreement, were still not filled. Read more at: http://www.timesofisrael.com/clalit-nurses-strike-enters-its-second-day/

Cancer: Not only world disease, BBC news 4th December 2012 by Joanne Silberner Uganda and Haiti

When the quest for sparkling teeth turns ugly, New vision December 06, 2012 by Agnes Kyotalengerire

Tracy Kintu, a front desk employee at a reputable firm in Kampala is bothered by her stained teeth. Given the nature of her job, Kintu’s desire is to have sparkling white teeth, as she is required to smile all day long. She is considering bleaching her teeth, but is not sure whether it is safe. Teeth bleaching or whitening is a cosmetic treatment of using bleach to make the teeth look brighter. “The process requires using chemicals to remove stains, including those that are inside the teeth,” explains Mbabali. Although bleaching improves the teeth’s appearance, Rwenyonyi says it has its downside. He says the most common effect is teeth sensitivity, especially when taking very hot or cold foods. However, Mbabali clarifies that bleaching does not change artificial components of teeth, for example crowns, white cement restorations and implants. Some dentists suggest that rinsing your mouth with a solution of hydrogen peroxide helps not only to kill the germs, but also bleach the teeth. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/637893-bleaching-when-the-quest-for-sparkling-teeth-turns-ugly.html

Dr Jackson Orem is on the front line of the change. He directs the Uganda Cancer Institute - the only dedicated cancer treatment facility in a country of 33 million people. Orem has arranged for Settimba to get a very effective and costly new cancer drug free of charge, courtesy of the manufacturer. There's paperwork involved, and drugs for only a few cancers are available this way. "They don't have early diagnosis. They don't actually even know that they have cancer," he says. Last year, the UN urged that more be done to detect and treat cancer in the developing world. George and Laura Bush recently toured Africa to bring attention to breast and cervical cancer. Orem, meanwhile, takes heart from changes in Uganda, where the government is putting up a modern 200-bed cancer hospital on a hill above the dilapidated one-storey tin-roofed buildings of the cancer institute. Read more at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-20524606

Government accused of relaxed opinions on circumcision Daily Monitor, Monday 3 December 2012 by Fredric Musisi Civil society organisations have accused the government of not doing enough to encourage male circumcision in the fight against HIV. Mr Richard Hasunira, an HIV/Aids adviser at HEPS-Uganda, a health rights organisation that advocates increased access to affordable essential medicines, said the Health ministry was “relaxed” about safe male circumcision (SMC) despite its benefits in reducing the risk of HIV infection. Less than half of the 1.2 million men targeted for circumcision in 2012 will be cut, a report by civil society organisations shows. The National HIV and Aids strategic plan 2007-2012 includes SMC as one of the prevention measures. Read more at: http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/Government-accused-of--relaxed--opinions-on-circumcision/-/688334/1635178/-/80q99n/-/index.html

Cancer tests fail over lack of manpower, Daily Monitor Tuesday, January 22 2013by Dan Wandera

Attempts by health officials to conduct cervical cancer screening for mothers at Kasana Health Centre IV in Luweero District have come to a standstill due to lack of trained staff and shortage of equipment. According to Dr Agaba Byamukama, the officer in-charge of the facility, mothers who turn up with cervical cancer symptoms are referred to Mulago Cancer Institute. We had embarked on the programme, hoping that we would have some of our health staff trained to handle this but the programme has not yet picked up. Even the little reagents we had for the tests got finished,” Dr Byamukama said. The exercise ensures that proactive measures are undertaken against cervical cancer which is one of the least attended to diseases at local health units,” a health official said. Read more at: http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/Cancer-tests-fail-over-lack-of-manpower/-/688334/1671774/-/9ly0my/-/index.html

Bringing HIV/AIDS out into the open in Liberia, Plus News Global HIV/AIDS news and analysis, 22 January 2013

Stigma, discrimination and difficulty in reaching health clinics has led over half of new HIV cases in Liberia to go untreated, says the National AIDS Control Programme of Liberia, which calls the situation “alarming” From 2006 to 2013 some 26,000 HIV cases were reported, but of that number just 10,911 patients are enrolled in treatment centres, according to the Aids Control Programme manager Sonpon Blamo Sieh. According to Liberia's demographic health survey, 1.5 percent of Liberia's 3.5 million people are HIV-positive, with 60 percent of those being women or girls. Treatment needs to be taken closer to people’s villages to improve continuity of care, she said. To date, women have been relatively quiet about raising awareness of the dangers of HIV. But recently this has shifted, as women’s groups all over the country have launched an assertive campaign to raise awareness of the disease, refute common myths about HIV, and break down persistent stigma. “The current statistics are alarming,” he told IRIN. “We are making progress [on fighting AIDS]… Now we know that the bigger challenge is to reach [and treat] the rest of the positive cases. Read more at: http://www.plusnews.org/Report/97307/Bringing-HIV-AIDS-out-into-the-open-in-Liberia

Quitting Smoking can Reduce Risk of Pneumonia in HIV-Infected People

For people who are HIV positive, bacterial pneumonia is a common threat and critical at the same time. A recent study suggests that smokers who were HIV positive had 50 percent more chances of getting the infection than those HIV-positive individuals who did not smoke. It was also observed that when the former group of people quit smoking, the same risk was considerably reduced. A metanalysis was done on the volunteers with HIV and researchers used the database of several thousand people participating in 14 studies in the U.S.A., Europe and South Africa. It was found that smokers with HIV had between a 70 and 100 percent higher risk of contracting bacterial pneumonia than their non-smoking counterparts. The study did not include CD4 count, which is the helper T cells in the body immune system, and the antiretroviral therapy used in the control of HIV.Antiretroviral treatment means that people with HIV can have a normal life expectancy. However, they still have substantially increased health risks compared to the general population, including risk of pneumonia. Our results show that smokers with HIV have twice the risk of bacterial pneumonia, but that stopping smoking can reduce this risk. Read more at http://www.counselheal.com/articles/3536/20130122/quitting-smoking-reduce-risk-pneumonia-hiv-infected.htm#vKAhHmQrKMJw8kKB.99

Experts say asthma linked to the workplace for one in six 22 Jan 2013

A new British study has suggested that one in six adults who are diagnosed with asthma have developed the condition while at work. Researchers used medical records of over 7,000 people born in 1958 to determine if they had suffered breathing problems before the age of 42. Participants who were treated for asthma or bronchitis before the age of 16 were ruled out of the study, while others were tested for lung capacity after they turned 42 and were asked questions relating to their employment history. The research, which was published in the respiratory journal, Thorax, found that asthma in adulthood was linked to 18 types of job – four of which involved cleaning. In addition to this, farming more than quadrupled the risk for the condition according to the study, while hairdressing doubled the risk. Experts say that a person’s working environment is to blame rather than their occupation per se, and they have identified hundreds of occupational agents that have been linked to asthma, including flour and grain and detergents. "Occupational asthma is widely under-recognised by employers, employees and healthcare professionals. Raising awareness that this is an almost entirely preventable disease would be a major step in reducing its incidence.” Read more at: http://www.workplacelaw.net/content/45757

Women should allow men heal after SMC Saturday, 01 December 2012 by Joan Akello

Safe Male Circumcision (SMC) policy was launched in September 2010 to reduce the risk of HIV infection in men by 60 percent. However, advocates say women and leaders have stalled its success.“Women should respect the ‘no sex for six weeks’ period for the circumcised men to heal although they have no say in the policy.” The policy targets circumcising at least 80 percent of adult males between 15 and 49 by 2015 but only 380,000 men have been circumcised since 2009 in Uganda. This is expected to avert 3.4 million new infections by 2025, cost US $ 1.5 billion and then save US$ 16.5 billion by 2015 in averted treatment costs. Richard Hasunira, HIV/AIDS adviser HEPS- Uganda attributed the low numbers to poor planning, coordination, documentation and implementation among stakeholders. He was addressing the press about this year’s World AIDS Day theme “Re engaging leaders for effective HIV prevention”. He added that most leaders have wrong information about SMC and this has misguided the public.

Poor HIV patients can travel free to ART centres Soon, economically weak HIV-positive patients in Karnataka will be reimbursed for the expenditure they incur travelling to their nearest Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) centres. The measure comes in the wake of a high instance of dropouts recorded at ART centres by the Karnataka State Aids Prevention Society (KSAPS). "The amount spent on travelling to the nearest ART centre will be reimbursed to poor HIV-positive patients," said Manoj Kumar Tripathi, project director, KSAPS. The Society also announced a rally in the city on December 1 to mark World Aids Day. "The rally will begin at Vidhana Soudha and end at Freedom Park. A day-long programme will focus on awareness of Aids," said Manoj. Read more at: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bangalore/Poor-HIV-patients-can-travel-free-to-ART-centres/articleshow/17396171.cms

DR. Congo Ebola outbreak officially ends,  VN Vaccine News Dialy November 28th 2012 by Paul Tinder An epidemic declared in mid-August in the Democratic Republic of Congo that infected 62 people and claimed 34 lives officially ended on Friday, according to the country’s health minister. Felix Kabange Numbi said that the country’s health ministry worked closely in cooperation with Doctors Without Borders, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization to stop the outbreak, AFP reports. The epidemic began in the Democratic Republic of Congo’s northeastern Orientale Province. The nation has recorded eight outbreaks of Ebola since the first was first reported near a river that gave the disease its name in 1976. Ebola is one of the world’s most virulent diseases. It is transmitted by direct contact with sweat, feces and blood. It can also be spread with sexual contact or the unprotected handling of contaminated corpses. Read more at: http://vaccinenewsdaily.com/ HIV testing goes Mobile Young Africa Live, 27 November 2012 by The new feature, which will provide YoungAfricaLive, a free mobile social network available to Vodacom customers, with comprehensive information on HIV testing sites across South Africa, will go live on World Aids Day, Saturday 1 December 2012. The info4africa database (formerly HIVAN/HIV-911) which has now been integrated into YAL is the most complete database of HCT (HIV Counseling and Testing) sites in South Africa, making YAL users able to search for, and find their nearest HIV Counseling and Testing site anywhere in South Africa Regular HIV testing is recognized globally as a key HIV prevention mechanism and promoting regular testing is a key objective of YoungAfricaLive and the Vodacom Mobile Health Project (which funds YoungAfricaLive SA with the Praekelt Foundation). The integration of the info4africa information will include HIV Clinic Location & Contacts when the new feature goes live on Saturday. Read more at: http://www.gadget.co.za/pebble.asp?relid=5455 Men at Risk of Prostate Cancer from Fizzy Drinks A study that went on for a period of 15 years, taken out by a group of researchers from the Lund University, has uncovered a fact that even one soft-drink a day by men can increase their risks of developing prostate cancer. The review has been published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The team has been warning men who love to drink sugary soft drinks, since another fact from the study is that the risk is not of an early-stage disease. But, one is risked at getting aggressive prostate cancer, which does not get cured easily and causes symptoms. Prostate cancer is commonly seen in British men and almost 41,000 people in Britain are affected by the same each year. Also, more than 10,000 people of them tend to lose their precious lives to the cancer. Though treatments for the same have improved, the number of cases and incomplete cure is still concerning. It is therefore being suggested to avoid fizzy drinks daily. Read more at: http://topnews.us/content/251916-men-risk-prostate-cancer-fizzy-drinks Courage has enabled them live with HIV/AIDS for 17 yearsPublish Date: Nov 19, 2012 by Patrick Jaramogi Florence Nansubuga, 43 is all smiles. Having tested HIV positive 16 years after the death of her husband, God is still keeping her strong. She is among the four ladies, who testify with ease how living positively means living normally. Nansubuga a mother of three and resident of Wabigalo tells her stories with joy, of how she has managed to remain alive for 16 years. Nansubuga became so weak due to reaction of drugs. “My skin changed to purple and blue, I had rushes all over my body. My community in Wabigalo shunned me. I lost my job in town,” she explained. She was diagnosed with tuberculosis. “When I was told I had to get 60 injections for TB, and a consortium of tablets, I said, I would rather die. The pain was intolerable, “she reminisces. “But one lady Noelina Namukisa, a counselor at Meeting Point in Namuwongo touched my heart when she told me that being infected is not the end of the world,” Namukisa said she resorted to helping HIV/AIDS patients in the slums of Soweto in Namuwongo after the number of death due to AIDs shot up in the early 90s. “People were dying every day. I decided to offer moral support by visiting them. With well-wishers coming on board, we started providing ARVs,” she said. Namukisa said to-date; the center takes care of over 1500 people living with HIV/AIDS, majority orphans as young as two months old. Pregnant women urged to attend antenatal care to avert premature births: Newvision Nov 20, 2012 by Agnes Kyotalengerire The minister of Health Dr. Christine Ondoa has urged expectant mothers to attend antenatal care and undergo thorough medical check-up to prevent premature births. Speaking during an inauguration of the World Prematurity Day at Mulago Nursing School grounds on 17th Saturday, Ondoa said expectant mothers should attend antenatal care at least four times before delivery as required of them.Currently, in Uganda 31% of children who die under the age of five are newborns. It is estimated that about 16,000 newborns die of complications from preterm birth each year accounting for 38% of neonatal deaths. The launch of World Prematurity Day is part of the Every Woman Every Child movement which is led by the UN secretary general Ban Ki-moon. The programme is aimed at taking forward the global strategy for women and children’s health and the achievement of the health MDGS 4 and 5. Read more at: Police stop visits to inmates over Ebola, November 20th 2012 20, 2012 by Darious Magara and Innocent Anguyo The Police have halted visitation of inmates in all prisons across the city and neighboring districts. The move is aimed at curbing the spread of the deadly Ebola haemorrhagic fever among inmates and other people. Addressing the media at a weekly Police briefing yesterday, Kampala Metropolitan Police spokesperson Ibin Ssenkumbi yesterday said the visitors will only be given access to the suspects if the reason is serious enough. “We hereby call upon friends, relatives and sympathisers of suspects to refrain from visiting them in the meantime because they will not be allowed to meet them (suspects),” he reiterated. Ssenkumbi, however, noted that the move is temporary, saying once the Ministry of Health declares the country Ebola-free, the suspects will receive visitors normally. The move comes two days after the Ebola virus claimed another life on Sunday, bringing the death toll in the latest outbreak of the infectious disease in the country to five. Another 12 suspected to have contracted the deadly virus are also admitted at Mulago, while another six are at Bombo Hospital. Health Intelligence also reveals that the number of people suspected to have contracted the epidemic had risen from 34 to 40 Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/637434-police-stop-visits-to-inmates-over-ebola.html Ebola outbreak in central Uganda kills at least 3 P November 18, 2012 by BNO News A new outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus has claimed the lives of at least three people in central Uganda, health authorities said on Saturday. It is the third outbreak of the disease so far this year, following deadly outbreaks in Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.  Laboratory investigations at the Uganda Virus Research Institute in Entebbe confirmed that two of the victims died of the Sudan strain of Ebola, while no samples were available for testing from the third victim. All three victims were known to each other, and two of them were from the same family. Before the outbreaks in DR Congo and Uganda, the last known case of Ebola was reported in May 2011 when a 12-year-old girl died in a town near the Ugandan capital of Kampala. Despite initial fears of an epidemic, and the Kenyan Ministry of Health issuing an alert to people living near the Ugandan border, no other cases were recorded.  Read more at: http://www.minews26.com/content/?p=21155 Pakistan must not overlook defecation problem Newvision, Monday, November 19, 2012 Uttering the word ‘defecation’ is often considered impolite. People say ‘going to the back’ and ‘folding legs’. Many people also ask where to wash their hands rather than where the toilet is, avoiding the ‘dirty’ word for the sake of politeness. While talking openly about defecation may cause discomfort or embarrassment, it is a topic we all need to discuss. More than one billion people around the world still practice open defecation, the practice of defecating outdoors. Of this number, more than 60 per cent live in Asia with India and Pakistan having the major share, according to a World Health Organization/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme report. In Pakistan 48 million people still defecate in open. World Toilet Day offers a timely reminder that we have a long way to go - and that the humble toilet is one of the key tools in the fight to create healthier, safer and more dignified living conditions for all: Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/637425-no-one-expected-me-to-live-beyond-12-years.html Sierraleone shifting tide on abortion law, Allafrica.com November 27th 2012 The new government is responding positively to health workers and youth groups who have long called for a change in the 1861 law banning abortion except in exceptional circumstances. A draft law which would make abortion legal under certain conditions, is currently waiting to be passed by parliament following the 17 November elections, according to Sas Kargbo, director of Reproductive Health at the Health Ministry. Campaigners say the unavailability of cheap and safe abortions is leading to severe health risks for women and girls and pushing up the maternal mortality rate. Sierra Leone has one of the world's highest maternal mortality rates: 890 women die for every 100,000 live births. The problem is most women seeking an abortion will turn to uncertified doctors or quacks who perform cheap abortions, as few can afford the SL 200,000 (US$46) fee that a certified doctor would charge. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201211280426.html Nurses demand protection from TB infection, Allafrica.com, November 14th 2012 Hospitals are not protecting their workers from tuberculosis (TB) infection, say nurses in Swaziland, who recently staged a rare public demonstration to draw attention to how vulnerable they are to this highly infectious disease. Nurses attached to the National TB Hospital in Swaziland's commercial hub, Manzini, are blaming inadequate infection measures at the hospital for the risk they face. TB is one of the primary killers and the main opportunistic disease in people living with HIV and AIDS. In a country with the world's highest HIV prevalence, 80 percent of HIV-positive people are co-infected with TB. Health personnel warn that government's inaction could make things worse. "Government is killing us with its negligence. We just buried one of our sisters [another nurse] who died of TB. She contracted TB at the hospital where she worked," Abigale Dube, a nurse and member of the Swaziland Democratic Nurses Union (SDNU). Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201211150349.html

Poor HIV patients can travel free to ART centres Soon, economically weak HIV-positive patients in Karnataka will be reimbursed for the expenditure they incur travelling to their nearest Anti Retroviral Therapy (ART) centres. The measure comes in the wake of a high instance of dropouts recorded at ART centres by the Karnataka State Aids Prevention Society (KSAPS). "The amount spent on travelling to the nearest ART centre will be reimbursed to poor HIV-positive patients," said Manoj Kumar Tripathi, project director, KSAPS. The Society also announced a rally in the city on December 1 to mark World Aids Day. "The rally will begin at Vidhana Soudha and end at Freedom Park. A day-long programme will focus on awareness of Aids," said Manoj. Read more at: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/bangalore/Poor-HIV-patients-can-travel-free-to-ART-centres/articleshow/17396171.cms

DR. Congo Ebola outbreak officially ends,  VN Vaccine News Dialy November 28th 2012 by Paul Tinder An epidemic declared in mid-August in the Democratic Republic of Congo that infected 62 people and claimed 34 lives officially ended on Friday, according to the country’s health minister. Felix Kabange Numbi said that the country’s health ministry worked closely in cooperation with Doctors Without Borders, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the World Health Organization to stop the outbreak, AFP reports. The epidemic began in the Democratic Republic of Congo’s northeastern Orientale Province. The nation has recorded eight outbreaks of Ebola since the first was first reported near a river that gave the disease its name in 1976. Ebola is one of the world’s most virulent diseases. It is transmitted by direct contact with sweat, feces and blood. It can also be spread with sexual contact or the unprotected handling of contaminated corpses. Read more at: http://vaccinenewsdaily.com/ HIV testing goes Mobile Young Africa Live, 27 November 2012 The new feature, which will provide YoungAfricaLive, a free mobile social network available to Vodacom customers, with comprehensive information on HIV testing sites across South Africa, will go live on World Aids Day, Saturday 1 December 2012. The info4africa database (formerly HIVAN/HIV-911) which has now been integrated into YAL is the most complete database of HCT (HIV Counseling and Testing) sites in South Africa, making YAL users able to search for, and find their nearest HIV Counseling and Testing site anywhere in South Africa Regular HIV testing is recognized globally as a key HIV prevention mechanism and promoting regular testing is a key objective of YoungAfricaLive and the Vodacom Mobile Health Project (which funds YoungAfricaLive SA with the Praekelt Foundation). The integration of the info4africa information will include HIV Clinic Location & Contacts when the new feature goes live on Saturday. Read more at: http://www.gadget.co.za/pebble.asp?relid=5455 Men at Risk of Prostate Cancer from Fizzy Drinks A study that went on for a period of 15 years, taken out by a group of researchers from the Lund University, has uncovered a fact that even one soft-drink a day by men can increase their risks of developing prostate cancer. The review has been published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. The team has been warning men who love to drink sugary soft drinks, since another fact from the study is that the risk is not of an early-stage disease. But, one is risked at getting aggressive prostate cancer, which does not get cured easily and causes symptoms. Prostate cancer is commonly seen in British men and almost 41,000 people in Britain are affected by the same each year. Also, more than 10,000 people of them tend to lose their precious lives to the cancer. Though treatments for the same have improved, the number of cases and incomplete cure is still concerning. It is therefore being suggested to avoid fizzy drinks daily. Read more at: http://topnews.us/content/251916-men-risk-prostate-cancer-fizzy-drinks Courage has enabled them live with HIV/AIDS for 17 yearsPublish Date: Nov 19, 2012 by Patrick Jaramogi Florence Nansubuga, 43 is all smiles. Having tested HIV positive 16 years after the death of her husband, God is still keeping her strong. She is among the four ladies, who testify with ease how living positively means living normally. Nansubuga a mother of three and resident of Wabigalo tells her stories with joy, of how she has managed to remain alive for 16 years. Nansubuga became so weak due to reaction of drugs. “My skin changed to purple and blue, I had rushes all over my body. My community in Wabigalo shunned me. I lost my job in town,” she explained. She was diagnosed with tuberculosis. “When I was told I had to get 60 injections for TB, and a consortium of tablets, I said, I would rather die. The pain was intolerable, “she reminisces. “But one lady Noelina Namukisa, a counselor at Meeting Point in Namuwongo touched my heart when she told me that being infected is not the end of the world,” Namukisa said she resorted to helping HIV/AIDS patients in the slums of Soweto in Namuwongo after the number of death due to AIDs shot up in the early 90s. “People were dying every day. I decided to offer moral support by visiting them. With well-wishers coming on board, we started providing ARVs,” she said. Namukisa said to-date; the center takes care of over 1500 people living with HIV/AIDS, majority orphans as young as two months old. Pregnant women urged to attend antenatal care to avert premature births: Newvision Nov 20, 2012 by Agnes Kyotalengerire The minister of Health Dr. Christine Ondoa has urged expectant mothers to attend antenatal care and undergo thorough medical check-up to prevent premature births. Speaking during an inauguration of the World Prematurity Day at Mulago Nursing School grounds on 17th Saturday, Ondoa said expectant mothers should attend antenatal care at least four times before delivery as required of them.Currently, in Uganda 31% of children who die under the age of five are newborns. It is estimated that about 16,000 newborns die of complications from preterm birth each year accounting for 38% of neonatal deaths. The launch of World Prematurity Day is part of the Every Woman Every Child movement which is led by the UN secretary general Ban Ki-moon. The programme is aimed at taking forward the global strategy for women and children’s health and the achievement of the health MDGS 4 and 5. Read more at: Police stop visits to inmates over Ebola, November 20th 2012 20, 2012 by Darious Magara and Innocent Anguyo The Police have halted visitation of inmates in all prisons across the city and neighboring districts. The move is aimed at curbing the spread of the deadly Ebola haemorrhagic fever among inmates and other people. Addressing the media at a weekly Police briefing yesterday, Kampala Metropolitan Police spokesperson Ibin Ssenkumbi yesterday said the visitors will only be given access to the suspects if the reason is serious enough. “We hereby call upon friends, relatives and sympathisers of suspects to refrain from visiting them in the meantime because they will not be allowed to meet them (suspects),” he reiterated. Ssenkumbi, however, noted that the move is temporary, saying once the Ministry of Health declares the country Ebola-free, the suspects will receive visitors normally. The move comes two days after the Ebola virus claimed another life on Sunday, bringing the death toll in the latest outbreak of the infectious disease in the country to five. Another 12 suspected to have contracted the deadly virus are also admitted at Mulago, while another six are at Bombo Hospital. Health Intelligence also reveals that the number of people suspected to have contracted the epidemic had risen from 34 to 40 Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/637434-police-stop-visits-to-inmates-over-ebola.html Ebola outbreak in central Uganda kills at least 3 P November 18, 2012 by BNO News A new outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus has claimed the lives of at least three people in central Uganda, health authorities said on Saturday. It is the third outbreak of the disease so far this year, following deadly outbreaks in Uganda and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.  Laboratory investigations at the Uganda Virus Research Institute in Entebbe confirmed that two of the victims died of the Sudan strain of Ebola, while no samples were available for testing from the third victim. All three victims were known to each other, and two of them were from the same family. Before the outbreaks in DR Congo and Uganda, the last known case of Ebola was reported in May 2011 when a 12-year-old girl died in a town near the Ugandan capital of Kampala. Despite initial fears of an epidemic, and the Kenyan Ministry of Health issuing an alert to people living near the Ugandan border, no other cases were recorded.  Read more at: http://www.minews26.com/content/?p=21155 Pakistan must not overlook defecation problem Newvision, Monday, November 19, 2012 Uttering the word ‘defecation’ is often considered impolite. People say ‘going to the back’ and ‘folding legs’. Many people also ask where to wash their hands rather than where the toilet is, avoiding the ‘dirty’ word for the sake of politeness. While talking openly about defecation may cause discomfort or embarrassment, it is a topic we all need to discuss. More than one billion people around the world still practice open defecation, the practice of defecating outdoors. Of this number, more than 60 per cent live in Asia with India and Pakistan having the major share, according to a World Health Organization/UNICEF Joint Monitoring Programme report. In Pakistan 48 million people still defecate in open. World Toilet Day offers a timely reminder that we have a long way to go - and that the humble toilet is one of the key tools in the fight to create healthier, safer and more dignified living conditions for all: Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/637425-no-one-expected-me-to-live-beyond-12-years.html Sierraleone shifting tide on abortion law, Allafrica.com November 27th 2012 The new government is responding positively to health workers and youth groups who have long called for a change in the 1861 law banning abortion except in exceptional circumstances. A draft law which would make abortion legal under certain conditions, is currently waiting to be passed by parliament following the 17 November elections, according to Sas Kargbo, director of Reproductive Health at the Health Ministry. Campaigners say the unavailability of cheap and safe abortions is leading to severe health risks for women and girls and pushing up the maternal mortality rate. Sierra Leone has one of the world's highest maternal mortality rates: 890 women die for every 100,000 live births. The problem is most women seeking an abortion will turn to uncertified doctors or quacks who perform cheap abortions, as few can afford the SL 200,000 (US$46) fee that a certified doctor would charge. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201211280426.html Nurses demand protection from TB infection, Allafrica.com, November 14th 2012 Hospitals are not protecting their workers from tuberculosis (TB) infection, say nurses in Swaziland, who recently staged a rare public demonstration to draw attention to how vulnerable they are to this highly infectious disease. Nurses attached to the National TB Hospital in Swaziland's commercial hub, Manzini, are blaming inadequate infection measures at the hospital for the risk they face. TB is one of the primary killers and the main opportunistic disease in people living with HIV and AIDS. In a country with the world's highest HIV prevalence, 80 percent of HIV-positive people are co-infected with TB. Health personnel warn that government's inaction could make things worse. "Government is killing us with its negligence. We just buried one of our sisters [another nurse] who died of TB. She contracted TB at the hospital where she worked," Abigale Dube, a nurse and member of the Swaziland Democratic Nurses Union (SDNU). Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201211150349.ht

Ebola outbreak in Uganda kills two, BBC News Africa, 15 November 2012 A fresh outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in Uganda has killed at least two people, the health ministry has said. Two members of the same family died over the weekend in a district not far from the capital, the health minister told the AFP news agency. An estimated 17 people died in western Uganda of the haemorrhagic fever during an outbreak in July. There is no known cure for Ebola, but patients can be treated for their symptoms with antibiotics, drugs for pain relief and for other diseases such as malaria, to strengthen their resistance. The virus causes death in 90% of human cases. Uganda has seen several major Ebola outbreaks over the past 12 years. The deadliest was in 2000 when 425 people were infected. More than half of them died.  Read more at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-africa-20338014

Govt announces free pneumonia vaccination, Newvision November 13, 2012 by Taddeo Bwambale and agencies The Government will next year start free vaccination against pneumonia, the biggest killer of children below the age of five worldwide. Health ministry spokesperson Rukia Nakamatte confirmed that the ministry had received funding to roll-out the Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine. The vaccine helps protect children against streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria. There is funding from the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation (GAVI) for the exercise.” In 2013, GAVI will contribute $21,235,500 (about sh53b) and $17,971,000 (about sh43b) in 2014, according to Citizen News Service. It is estimated that at least 11,000 lives of children under five years and sh2.6b in direct medical costs will be saved if the anticipated 92% coverage of the pneumococcal vaccination programme is achieved by the end of 2014. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/637245-govt-announces-free-pneumonia-vaccination.html Pneumonia Big threat for children, The Times of India, 13th November 2012 Pneumonia is turning out to be the leading cause of mortality among children in the six month-five years age group due to lack of early vaccination, the Indian Academy of Paediatrics said on Monday, urging the World Health Organisation to intervene. Around 5 lakh children, mostly from the lower socio-economic background, die of pneumonia every year. Unlike other diseases like measles, pneumonia does not figure in the health plan of the United Nation's health programme, experts said."The younger the children, greater is the risk of contracting the disease. So within six months of age, three dozes of both HIB and Pneumococcal vaccine should be administered to prevent the disease. The long term plan of eradicating pneumonia is to increase the nutrition quotient among children within the age group of five, he added. Read more at: http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/city/hyderabad/Pneumonia-big-threat-for-children/articleshow/17200799.cms Resveratrol could boost radiation therapy, 13th November, 2012 by Andy Young with Movember well underway

There is a focus on men’s health this month and scientists hope they may have made a key breakthrough in prostate cancer treatment. It has previously been claimed that red wine can have a positive effect on cardiovascular health and stroke prevention as well as helping decrease prostate cancer. This breakthrough shows the compound, called resveratrol, can help with the treatment of prostate cancer. Researchers from the University of Missouri have found, for the first time, that resveratrol makes prostate tumour cells more susceptible to radiation treatment. Resveratrol is found in red wine and grapes skins. The next stage for the treatment is animal testing before clinical trials can begin. If the trials are successful, it could lead to a significant development in cancer treatment in the next few years. “By targeting the fibroblasts that control the growth of the cancer these new treatments could be both more effective and likely to lead to significantly fewer side effects.” Read more on: http://www.thedrinksbusiness.com/2012/11/red-wine-could-help-in-fight-against-prostate-cancer/

Affordable drugs vital for fight against malaria, New vision, 4 November 2012 by Irene Mirembe According to the 2011 Demographic and Health Survey, only 43% of children with malaria access drugs. If not treated, malaria can become life-threatening by disrupting the blood supply to vital organs. In many parts of the world, the parasites have developed resistance to a number of drugs. Malaria is responsible for more deaths than any other disease in Uganda, according to the 2006 Uganda Demographic Health Survey. The health ministry recommends that all cases of suspected malaria be confirmed using parasite-based diagnostic testing and rapid diagnostic test before administering treatment. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201211050048.html

Marburg survivor narrates ordeal, New vision November 04, 2012 by Good luck Musinguzi Obed Musinguzi Tutegyerize, 25, was last week discharged from hospital after fully recovering from Marburg fever. He was sick for nearly one month. Until recently, Tutegyerize’s family was seen as the most progressive household in Rwabirundo village, Kitumba sub-county, Kabale district. When a strange illness killed four members of the family, including a university lecturer, many blamed it on witchcraft by envious neighbors. His sister first became sick in July 2012 and was admitted at Rugarama Health Centre. She was treated for typhoid and brucellosis and she recovered. Today, he has been co-opted into the Marburg task force to help with educating the public about the disease. At least nine people, including a health worker, have died of Marburg in five districts (Kabale, Kampala, Ibanda, Mbarara, Kabarole) since the outbreak in September. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/637017-marburg-survivor-narrates-ordeal.html

Unsealed tablets banned, New vision 4 November 2012 by Carol Natukunda, The Government has banned the sale of bare tablets, usually stocked in plastic tins or containers. The ban is effective January 2013. According to a directive from the National Drug Authority (NDA), all pharmacies and drug shops will be required to stock and dispense drugs only sealed in the blister strip sachets. "Unsealed tablets packed only in containers are easily exposed to contamination once the lid is unsealed. Some drug outlets are unhygienic yet the tablets are touched while dispensing them to patients. He, however, stated that tablets and capsules stocked in bulk packages would still be allowed in hospitals and health centres, for "management and monitoring purposes Globally, the demand for blister packaging is increasing as drug manufactures rely more on labelling as means to protect and promote their products, increase patient compliance, and meet new health regulations. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201211050064.html

HPV test for oral cancers may improve patient outcomes and treatments, Allafrica.com The RNAscope* test can be carried out in hospitals and looks for the presence of the Human papillomavirus (HPV) in oropharyngeal cancers**. Doctors will be able to use the results to classify these cancers as HPV positive or negative and offer treatment accordingly. Researchers at Liverpool and Newcastle universities analysed 79 oropharyngeal tumour samples for HPV using different techniques. They found that the accuracy of classification in the RNAscope test was similar to that of more complex laboratory results. Andrew Schache, study author based at the University of Liverpool, said: “Testing the HPV status of cancers will allow us to pick the most appropriate patients for clinical trials and hopefully help to develop new medicines based on a better understanding of these cancers. “But the accuracy so far is proving to be very promising and this work will help us to target patients in the most effective way possible. Read more at: http://www.healthcanal.com/cancers/33592-HPV-test-for-oral-cancers-may-improve-patient-outcomes-and-treatments.html

The Marburg Virus Puzzle, The Independent, Sunday, 04 November 2012 by Sarah Namulondo Since the ministry of Health declared an outbreak of the viral hemorrhagic fever, Marburg, in Kitumba sub-county in Kabale district on Oct.19, questions have been asked about the real cause, origin and efforts to find treatment for the disease. Although the Marburg virus was first identified and traced to Uganda in 1967, the latest attack is the third in five years since 2007.  With no vaccine against Marburg diseases as yet, which will probably never come as Marburg disease is such a rear disease, Thimm says a quick diagnosis of its existence with the help of a well-trained and equipped Virus laboratory, and an equally quick containment of its spread by absolutely dense isolation of suspected patients is by far the most effective method against Marburg disease. He says the Uganda Medical Service has very effectively proved again that it can do this.

Salt intake associated with stomach cancer, Newvision, Nov 02, 2012By Michael Bamuwamye Salt is a crystalline mineral composed primarily of the chemical compound, sodium chloride. In small quantities, salt is necessary for human health, but in excess, it is harmful. Salt is the main source of sodium, which is vital for controlling the amount of water in the body, maintaining the normal pH of blood, transmitting nerve signals and helping muscular contraction. Protein foods generally contain more naturally existing sodium than vegetables and grains, whereas fruits contain little or none. Vegetables like garlic and onions, as well as fruits are known to protect against stomach cancers. Legumes including soya and soya products also protect against stomach cancer.  The overall advice, therefore, is to tremendously reduce our salt intake and include more fruits and vegetables in our diet in order to reduce our risk to strokes and cancers in general. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/636995-salt-intake-associated-with-stomach-cancer.html Be wary of Drugs without Mobile Authentication service, ORHII warns by Dare Adekanmbi Monday, 05 November 2012 Director-General, National Agency for Food, Drug Administration and Control (NAFDAC), Dr Paul Orhii, has alerted Nigerians to the danger posed to their health by taking drugs that do not have the Mobile Authentication Service (MAS), urging them to begin to reject such drugs from January. He said MAS was an anti-counterfeiting solution technology devised to enable Nigerians to verify the originality or otherwise of the drugs right at the point of purchase, adding that it was part of the war being waged against drug counterfeiting in the nation.  “The consumer will send these numbers to a short code — 38353 — and instantly, he or she receives an SMS confirming the authenticity of the drug in his or her hand.  “The SMS is free and does not attract regular charges. This decision will take full effect by January 2013 and all Nigerians must reject any drug that does not have MAS on it by that time,” he said. Read more at: http://www.tribune.com.ng/index.php/news/50325-be-wary-of-drugs-without-mobile-authentication-service-orhii-warns Yellow fever kills 67 in Darfur, Kuwait News Agency - 08th  November 2012 KHARTOUM, Nov 8 (KUNA) -- The yellow fever outbreak in the Sudanese capital has killed 67 people so far, Federal Minister of Heath Bahar Idris Abu Garda announced Thursday, adding that 194 cases were reported, west Darfur Read more at: http://www.kuna.net.kw/ArticleDetails.aspx?id=2272900&language=en Uganda sees mixed progress in Male Circumcision Campaign to Combat Aids An ambitious circumcision scheme to prevent Aids-HIV in Uganda needs to be co-ordinated and scaled up to meet targets. Read more at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2012/nov/08/uganda-progress-male-circumcision-aids Chemotherapies and radiation not ‘cure’ all, Nov 09, 2012 By Dr. Cory Couillard According to recent research, traditional cancer treatments may actually invite the growth of cancer stem cells. These stem cells, just one type of cell found throughout cancerous tumors, promote tumor growth as well as the spread of cancer within the body. Cancer stem cells have also shown the ability to be resistant to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. These common cancer treatments have shown the ability to reduce overall tumor mass, but have not successfully reduced the number of cancer stem cells. This increases the ratio of stem cells to non-stem cells. As a result, tumors can actually become more malignant as treatment progresses. By targeting these newly identified cancer 'stem' cells, we are attacking the foundation of tumor growth, rather than treating the symptoms of it," said Dr. Josep Domingo-Domenech, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pathology at Mount Sinai. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/637159-chemotherapies-and-radiation-not-cure-all.html HIV rate back on the rise in Uganda, All Africa The rising number of new infections now estimated at 130,000 per year has pushed Uganda's HIV prevalence rate up from 6.4 percent in 2005 to 7.3 percent last year. A country that was once a star of the international Aids community is now moving backwards. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/view/group/main/main/id/00020090.html

Uganda says it is now free of deadly Ebola virus, Googlenews.com Friday October 5th 2012 by Elias Biryabarema Uganda is now free from Ebola, the Health Ministry said, two months after an outbreak of the deadly virus killed at least 16 people. There is no cure for Ebola, which is transmitted by close contact and bodily fluids, though doctors can treat the symptoms which include diarrhea and vomiting, and some patients can survive. "The Ministry of Health has ... officially declared an end of the Ebola outbreak that broke out in Kibaale district in July. This follows completion of the 42 days of the post-Ebola surveillance countdown period which is a pre-requisite of the World Health Organization," it said in a statement late on Thursday. Some of the area's residents occasionally kill and eat the chimpanzees and monkeys despite warnings by the government. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, an Ebola outbreak that started in August has killed 31, including five health workers, according to WHO statistics. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/health/

Busting the myth behind ‘ekinanansi’ New vision October 04, 2012 by Francis Kagolo and Carol Natukunda There is no doubt; sex is a key factor in marriage. But what happens when your wife’s vagina gets ‘closed’ because of a large swelling therein and the penis cannot penetrate? Stories are told of how women in Buganda would develop “pineapple-like” boils (ebinanansi) in their private parts, a problem they would blame on witchcraft from co-wives who wanted to personalise a polygamous husband. The cause of the “pineapple-like” boils is yet to be proved scientifically, medical experts have revealed a new clinical condition, which almost manifests in a similar way. What is clear, though, is that it is the female version of hydrocele, or what some call the vaginal hydrocele. Dr. Ambrose Onapa, the country programme manager of the Research Triangle Institute, describes the problem as a swelling that starts developing from the valve inside the vagina. As it continues to swell, the swelling accumulates water. And as time goes by, it slowly pushes out.  Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/635974-busting-the-myth-behind-ekinanansi.html Will sh49b additional funding boost health services? Wednesday, Oct 03, 2012 This financial year, the Government has allocated an additional sh49.5b to the health ministry. Of this, sh6.5b has been availed immediately to kick-start the recruitment of over 6,000 health workers in health centres III, IV and V. The health ministry has been given an additional sh49.5b, bringing an end to a week-long debate on the issue regarding the health budget. Out of the sh49.5b, sh6.5b will cater for recruitment of 6,172 health workers. These include senior medical officers, medical officers, senior clinical officers, enrolled nurses and midwives, anaesthetic assistants, laboratory technicians, nursing officers and midwives. Rosette Mutambi, the executive director of HEPS-Uganda, says it is inexcusable to expect one or two health workers to work day and night in order to offer services to a whole parish. “Some health centres are being manned by nursing aides, while in others, patients can even be attended to by security guards,” Mutambi says. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/635938-will-sh49b-additional-funding-boost-health-services-.html Civil society slams govt’s offer, New vision Thursday 4th October 2012 Civil society organisations are not happy with sh49.5b additional funding to the health ministry. Speaking at a press conference in Kamwokya on Wednesday, Leonard Okello, the country director of Alliance, an HIV/AIDS NGO, said the decision to use sh3.5b, out of the sh49.5b to increase allowances of a few medical officers at health centre IVs so that their consolidated bill would be sh2.5m a month, ignored the importance of the frontline cadres. “Midwives and nurses who take home a pittance, but are the daily donkeys treating women, children and people living with HIV, expected to benefit from this decision,” he said.“ Premier Amama Mbabazi, while delivering the speech on the additional funding for the health sector, said: “We all agreed on the urgent need to improve health care in the country. We shall, therefore, address the human resource challenges so as to have a properly-functioning system at the local government level throughout the country.” Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/635938-will-sh49b-additional-funding-boost-health-services-.html Spotlight on HIV/AIDS among Women by Vera Yakovchenko Sunday, September 30, 2012. Putting the spotlight on women and HIV/AIDS in America, she shared the latest CDC data indicating  more than 260,000 U.S. women are living with HIV. The data also show that women of color, particularly Black women, have been especially hard hit and represent the majority of new HIV infections and AIDS diagnoses among women, and the majority of women living with the disease. Her remarks laid the foundation for a series of presentations by women leaders from the HIV community discussing what is and can yet be done to turn the tide of the epidemic among women: One way to better address the needs of women at risk for or living with HIV, suggested one participant, is ensuring that communities are prepared to take full advantage of the implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Read more at: http://blog.aids.gov/2012/10/u-s-conference-on-aids-highlights-from-day-1.html. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/635938-will-sh49b-additional-funding-boost-health-services-.html HIV 'made' new deadly Salmonella – study BBC News by James Gallagher An epidemic of a deadly strain of Salmonella has swept across the whole of Africa by "taking advantage" of the spread of HIV, according to an international team of researchers. Their study, published in Nature Genetics, said weakened immune systems caused by HIV allowed it to spread. One in four people in Africa infected with the strain died. It is thought to be the first time a bug has spread so widely in the wake of HIV. There are hundreds of different strains, or versions, of Salmonella. Cases of this form of invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella - which causes fever, headaches, respiratory problems and sometimes death - have been recognised in Africa for more than a decade. But researchers have only just realised they were all part of a single epidemic causing deaths across a continent. Prof Gordon Dougan said, HIV attacks the immune system and leaves people more vulnerable to other infections. It is thought the strain took advantage of this weakness and spread. The research team said the bacterium was given the chance to "enter, adapt, circulate and thrive". Read more at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-19727630 Menstrual cup: Temporary relief for fistula patients September 24, 2012 by Shamilla Kara The menstrual cup is the talk of town.

While the bell-shaped cup is being hyped as a cheaper, eco-friendly, less-risky and cost-saving menstruation product, there is another debate brewing about how it can be used in managing obstetric fistula before surgery. As an alternative to sanitary pads and tampons, the silicone cup comes with compliments galore. “They are more hygienic and cost-effective than sanitary pads and tampons,” says Dr. Romano Byaruhanga, a senior gynaecologist at the Kampala Medical Chambers, where the cup is sold. At sh50, 000, it is still considered cheaper than tampons and pads because it can last for five to 10 years.“It is reusable and one does not have to purchase it on a monthly basis. It also has a lower risk of toxic shock syndrome compared to tampons,” says Dr. Fred Kirya, a senior consultant surgeon at Soroti Referral Hospital.  The menstrual cup cannot work for all fistula patients.  “We could not recommend the cups to two of our patients because their vaginas were so narrow and the cup could not go in,” says Nakalema who recommends the cup after the history of a woman is taken and extensive counselling on use and care offered.

Indian women support cancer patients Sep 25, 2012 by John Agaba Yesterday, another hundreds of Ugandans took to the tarmac, courtesy of the Indian Women Association in Uganda (IWA). Purpose? To support the Uganda Cancer Institute at Mulago Hospital. The marathon started at 7:30am at Kati Kati grounds, with information and national guidance minister Mary Karooro Okurut flagging it off. It’s quite humbling this new trend in Ugandans, since waking up as early as 5:00am on a Sunday to be on the tarmac by 7:00am, all for charity, says something good about the runner.  Adult participants paid sh25, 000 and children sh15, 000.  And there were more parents who came out with their children just so they could raise more bucks for the cause. Even though most of them and their children walked the entire track, at least their taking part meant they raised money for the cause, whose races 10km or 5km long. Even people on wheelchairs participated how nice! Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/635617-indian-women-support-cancer-patients.html Alcohol’s effects are more than intoxicating New vision, October 01, 2012 by Cory Couillard Alcohol has been named the world’s third greatest risk factor in the development of premature disease.

This seemingly innocent drink is a staple in social gatherings but its effects often spills over into society as a whole. Alcohol’s intoxicating, toxic and dependence-producing properties play a role in violence, child neglect and abuse, shattered relationships and poor job performance.  The harmful use of alcohol is a global problem that claims at least 2.5 million lives per year.  The sad reality is that many of the lives lost are caused by an intoxicated person’s poor choices that ultimately resulted in the harm of others.  Alcohol use is very similar to the concept of second hand smoke; it impacts everyone around you.  According to statistics, men are more likely than women to drink excessively and make poor decisions that can result in serious injury or death. Studies now demonstrate the damaging effects of alcohol on hormones of the body. Hormones have a direct impact on weight gain, diabetes and cancer. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/635840-alcohol-s-effects-are-more-than-intoxicating.html

 

AAR offer free medical treatment, plants trees at KitantePublish September 27 by Michael Odeng Pupils of Kitante Primary School last week received a health boost from AAR health services at their school. Part of the free medical package included de-worming, verification of medical status, vaccination in addition to treatment of various common ailments among pupils. Over 120 pupils were de-wormed. During the visit, AAR staff also planted over five fruit and shade trees at the school garden aimed at instigating the spirit of environmental nurturing and awareness creation. A key health talk was also part of the day’s event. The environmentally viable community activities were aimed at improving living conditions of communities and initiatives that foster a healthy environment. Speaking during the AAR outreach, Ivan Baliboola, AAR’s public relations administrator said involving schools directly in health programmes is key. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/635694-aar-offer-free-medical-treatment-plants-trees-at-kitante.html

Ibanda district gets lab, sh200m HIV equipment by Agnes Kyotalengerire People living with HIV/AIDS in Ibanda district no longer have to travel to Mbarara and Sheema districts to get services, after Ruhoko health centre IV acquired a fully-equipped laboratory. The equipment, including a CD4 count machine, all worth sh200m, will help HIV/AIDS patients undergo various tests and treatment. The renovation of the laboratory and procurement of the equipment was funded by PEPFAR/United States Agency for International Development (USAID), through Star South West Project. Speaking during the launch of the laboratory on Tuesday, John Mark Winfield, the deputy USAID mission director, said the equipment would facilitate the smooth operation of the laboratory to improve the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS in the community. “I urge the medical staff to ensure proper use of the equipment to improve people’s lives,” he said. Other equipment delivered included a haematology analyser and a clinical chemistry machine, with all their accessories. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/635939-ibanda-district-gets-lab-sh200m-hiv-equipment.html South Africa gets ready for HIV Vaccine trials, Allafrica.com Monday October 1st by Ayanda Mkhwanazi, 1 October 2012 A vaccine candidate which showed that it can protect against HIV infection by up to 31% when tested in Thailand three years ago will be further tested in South Africa as soon as next year. South Africa is the first country outside of Thailand to test the vaccine candidate that made worldwide headlines three years ago. Results of the RV144 Thai study gave hope that it is possible to find a vaccine to prevent HIV infection when it was found that the study vaccine had a 31% efficacy. Co-principal investigator for the HIV Vaccine Clinical Trials Network, Dr Glenda Gray, says the South African leg of the trial will be a Phase III clinical study, which will look into the efficacy of the vaccine in the South African population. She says the vaccine would have to be modified to fit the circulating strain in South Africa. There are different circulating HIV strains in the world. The Thai vaccine was manufactured to fit strains E and B. In South Africa, the prevalent strain is C. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201210011025.html Taking HIV testing to homes living with AIDS, by Khopotso Bodbe September 18th 2012. Home-based HIV testing, which enables you and your family to have an HIV test in the privacy of your own home without having to go to a health facility, is one of the newest efforts to be introduced to get people to know their HIV status. The Mncwarhane family in Hlalanikahle Extension 1 township in eMalahleni, in Mpumalanga, is one of the first house-holds to test for HIV together in a home-based HIV testing programme. "Almost all of us tested. Only one child wasn't around when we got tested. But all of us got tested, except for the under-age child", says sixty-something year-old David Mcnwarhane, the patriarch of the family of seven. Home-based HIV testing gave David's oldest off-spring, 39-year-old Esther, her first ever opportunity to test for HIV. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201209190541.html Funding to expand HIV care, Friday 5th 2012, Cross roadsnews.com Georgia has been awarded $2.5 million to link more HIV-positive residents with treatment. The Department of Public Health announced the award from the national Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Oct. 2. Dr. J. Patrick O’Neal, director of the state’s Division of Health Protection, said the award will further efforts to reduce the spread of HIV infection.  “We’re talking about people who may or may not know they’re HIV-positive and for whatever reason are not in care,” O’Neal said. “Linking these patients with treatment is essential to reducing HIV transmission in Georgia.” “There are a significant number of HIV-positive individuals in Georgia who are not receiving care and treatment,” O’Neal said. “Those patients are not getting treatment for any number of reasons – they are afraid to learn the results of their HIV tests, they have received the results but are in denial over them, or they have started treatment and simply dropped out.” Read more: http://www.crossroadsnews.com/view/full_story/20372225/article-Funding-to-expand-HIV-care-?instance=secondary_stories_left_column Scientists offer fertility hope with stem cell eggs  Press Trusted of India October 2012 For the first time, researchers claim to have developed viable eggs using normal cells from adult mice, raising hope for cure for infertility in humans. The breakthrough raises the possibility that women who are unable to produce eggs naturally could now have them created in a test tube from their own cells and then plant them back into their body, Japanese researchers said. The research team, from Kyoto University, started with , "blank" stem cells capable of turning into other types and used a cocktail of nutrients to turn them into very early-stage eggs, the 'Daily Mail' reported. These were then grown in the lab with ovary cells before being transplanted into mice ovaries to mature. However, the big differences between mice and humans and the need for extensive safety testing mean that test-tube eggs are still at least a decade away from use in fertility clinics. Read more at:http://www.business-standard.com/generalnews/news/scientists-offer-fertility-hopestem-cell-eggs/64692/

Fake sausages flood local market, New Vision Saturday August 14, 2012 by Prossy Nandudu

Substandard sausages that have flooded the market are threatening the growth of the beef processing industry. This has created unfair competition and is exposing people to poorly-processed sausages that are harmful to their health. Such sausages contain bacteria like salmonella and E.coli, said Fresh Cuts boss Stephen Duyck. “We invest in proper facilities and certify our products with the best food standards, but we are now suffering from competitors who mix products in their garages without following food safety standards and do not pay taxes,” Duyck said. UMA boss Sebagala Kigozi said he will engage the Uganda National Bureau of Standards over required standards in sausage processing. He also advised Fresh Cuts to consider gazzeting areas that sell its products to avoid mixing up their sausages with poor quality products.

Ebola outbreak under control – health official, New Vision, Saturday August 14, 2012

The recent reported outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus in Uganda “is under control” but has not yet been fully eradicated, a Ugandan health official has said. Two suspicious cases were admitted to a hospital close to the scene of the outbreak over the weekend, bringing to nine the total number of people currently in isolation, the official said. Sixteen people have died since the latest outbreak started in early July in Uganda's western Kibale district, some 200 kilometres (120 miles) from Kampala, and around 50 kilometres from the border with Democratic Republic of Congo.A total of 165 people living in the community remain under observation, while 243 people who were thought to have come into contact with the virus have turned out negative. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/634091-ebola-outbreak-under-control-health-official.html

Divorced mother strangles own baby, blames spouse for neglect:

When 34-year-old Jesca Driciru went into labour on the night of Monday July 30, she sneaked out of her parents’ home into a nearby bush to deliver.And several hours later, she emerged from the bush, with a flattened stomach but not a baby in hand. This raised the suspicion of her family and neighbours, who then reported the matter to clan leaders and Local Council chairpersons. A search was mounted by residents and the lifeless body of the infant was found in the bush. The mother had strangled her son to death. Though police have preferred charge of infanticide, the file is awaiting sanction from Resident State Attorney. Read more at: http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/Divorced+mother+strangles+own+baby++blames+spouse+for+neglect/-/688334/1475546/-/6kb2od/-/index.html

Bidandi seeks medical support from GovtPublish Date: Aug 10, 2012 by Jeff Andrew Lule

Former local government minister Jaberi Bidandi Ssali has asked the Government for financial assistance on his medical expenses. Bidandi, the leader of the People’s Progressive Party, was last month flown to Bangkok in Thailand for specialised treatment after spending a couple of days at International Hospital, Kampala. Bidandi’s political assistant, Sadam Gayira, told New Vision that Bidandi wrote to the Prime Minister’s office, asking the Government to foot part of the medical expenses. “He also explained to them about his sickness and the reason he had to be flown abroad,” he said. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/633966-bidandi-seeks-medical-support-from-govt.html

Shortage of circumcision tools amid high demand New vision Aug 13, 2012 by Francis Omorut

Health facilities across the country have run out of supplies for Safe Male Circumcision kits, an HIV expert has said. Dr. Carol Nakkazi who is attached to Uganda AIDS Commission (UAC) says there is a huge demand for SMC across the country but the tool kits for conducting male circumcision procedure are inadequate.“The Ministry of Health and Uganda AIDS Commission have done mass mobilization across the country and it has created high demand for male circumcision as men flock health facilities to be circumcised only to be disappointed after the tool kits have run out,” Dr. Nakkazi said. The kit for carrying out surgical circumcision includes reusable and disposable supplies. Her appeal to government is to allow the National Medical Stores to procure male circumcision supplies to address the shortage in the country. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/634059-shortage-of-circumcision-tools-amid-high-demand.html

Men urged to support their women breastfeed, New vision Tuesday August 10, 2012 by John Agaba and Norah Mutesi

Men have been urged to support their women breast feed. As we concluded the breast feeding week yesterday some of the challenges highlighted was that fewer women today were exclusively breast feeding their children, a trend that is worrying. The breast feeding week started on Wednesday (August 1st) and ended yesterday.  During the week emphasis was on the need for breastfeeding, how to breastfeed, and how working mothers can juggle between breastfeeding and their careers. Experts noted that women today were increasingly neglecting breastfeeding their babies in favour of formula milk, which is not as nutritious and suitable for babies. According to experts, babies who don’t breastfeed are more likely to be obese, stunted, poor performers in class and prone to illnesses. “Currently pneumonia is the leading killer of babies in Uganda but breast milk has the nutrients that can boost the baby’s immunity,’’ according to Dr. Nankunda. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/633984-men-urged-to-support-their-women-breastfeed.html

Nebbi deaths due to dysentery, not Ebola, New vision Tuesday Aug 10, 2012by Benedict Okethwengu in Nebbi

The Nebbi district health officer Dr. Oryema Jakor has clarified that the couple whose death last Sunday sparked off an Ebola scare in the district could have died of dysentery and not the deadly hemorrhagic fever now reported in Kibaale district. Luciano Opio, 81 and his wife Celestina Ongoja, 75 both residents of Obat village succumbed to death at Angal Hospital due to occasional sores in the mouth, abdominal pain, fever, vomiting and bloody diarrhea which ignited fears that they could have died of Ebola. Dr. Jakor told New Vsion that they have clinically examined the two deaths and noted that there are strong indicators that dysentery was the cause of the ageing couple’s death. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/633983-nebbi-deaths-due-to-dysentery-not-ebola.html

Uganda urged on Ebola aftermath by Emma Onyango, allafrica.com, 13 august 2012

Over the past year, Uganda has received very impressive reviews concerning her tourism potential. The country was ranked as the number one Tourist Destination for 2012 by Lonely Planet and has received rave reviews about her tourist attractions. However, in recent weeks, just like birds on abandoning their abode for a new destination, tourists are cancelling their travel as a result of the Ebola haemorrhagic virus. Disseminating information about the outbreak and updates about the cases by the government was another point of expression. "It is not just about government making statements, they should make it clear that they have it under control. "Uganda is safe and government has put in place preventive measures as well as public awareness updates. Tour Operators, drivers and guides have all been sensitized," Byamukama said. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201208140034.html

India sees HIV infection drop by 56 percentTuesday14 August 2012

One of the few countries globally to have made inroads into combating HIV and AIDS, India reported that the country has seen a 56 percent decline in HIV infections over the past decade. New evidence from the latest round of HIV Sentinel Surveillance shows further decline in the HIV Prevalence among general population as well as high-risk groups, he said at the inaugural ceremony of the HIV Vaccine Symposium in New Delhi. One of the successful interventions of the National AIDS Control Program has been the Targeted Interventions (TIs), whose main objective is to improve health-seeking behaviour of high-risk groups and reducing their vulnerability and risk to acquire Sexually Transmitted and HIV infections. Besides the domestic program, India has been providing around 80 percent of global antiretroviral (ARV) drug demand.

How to prevent cervical cancer August 13, 2012

“The day I discovered I had precancerous cells in my cervix is one I won’t forget,” says Dubai resident Nancy Kinsley. “Not because it was the worst day of my life, but because I refuse to let myself forget.” For 36-year-old Nancy, this precancerous diagnosis eight years ago is a reminder not only that she cannot take her health for granted, but that having a regular Pap test (smear test), at the very least, is a health investment that pays off. Luckily Nancy discovered her diagnosis in time, before cervical cancer took hold, but sadly not in time to save her womb – she was advised to have a hysterectomy at the age of 29 due to her diagnosis. Nancy says she wasn’t willing to take any chances with her health, so she agreed with her doctor’s recommendation that she have a hysterectomy; a decision she now regrets.  Read more at: http://gulfnews.com/life-style/health/how-to-prevent-cervical-cancer-1.1061350

Psychologists recommend oral sex to reduce morning sickness

A recent claim made by psychologist Gordon Galluphas caught the attention of one and all for the reasons that it recommended oral sex for women to avoid morning sickness. The psychologist at the University at Albany-SUNY claimed that women who intake sperms from their male partners are more likely to avoid the risk of morning sickness."It's the father's contribution to the foetus that makes the chemistry different from the chemistry of the mother. Therefore, high-frequency insemination by the foetus' father may promote immuno-tolerance”, said Gallup. There are many women who are affected by morning sickness with symptoms more likely to bother.Read more at: http://frenchtribune.com/teneur/1212818-psychologist-recommends-oral-sex-reduce-morning-sickness

Uganda bans Indian drug supplier, New vision, Sunday August 08, 2012 by Anne Mugisa

The National Drug Authority (NDA) has temporarily banned 67 medicines from Flamingo, an Indian-based pharmaceutical company, because they were found to be substandard.The affected medicines include anti-fungals, anti-malarials, steroids, vitamin supplements, painkillers, dewormers and antibiotics, which are the majority on the list, valued at over sh2.5b.Experts say the substandard medicines could result in drug-resistant disease strains, which could be passed on to other people. In a letter dated July 25, 2012, the NDA executive director, Gordon Sematiko, stated that Flamingo Pharmaceuticals did not comply with the good manufacturing practice. He said that more tests on the drugs are still being carried out. So far, one of the drugs, hydrocortisone, has been found to be bad and the NDA has ordered its recall. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/633899-uganda-bans-indian-drug-supplier.html

HIV+ mothers and their babies thrive on treatment allAfrica.com by Sue Valentine, 27 July 2012

At 9 a.m. each morning and 9 p.m. each evening, in her shack on the outskirts of Cape Town, Nomsa diligently takes the antiretroviral medication that makes her HIV-positive status a manageable condition rather than a death sentence. But over the past month, her morning routine has changed. Since giving birth to a baby girl, not only does Nomsa take her own medicine, but she also doses her newborn with a special paediatric formula of anti-retroviral syrup. "She loves her food, and she loves the syrup. It's sweet," says Nomsa of the dark-haired baby in her arms, wrapped warmly against the cold Cape Town winter and drinking from a bottle of formula feed. Nomsa is one of the many women enrolled in the Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission programme in Site B, Khayelitsha. Measures that block transmission of the virus that causes Aids from mothers to their babies has been one of the hotly debated topics at the 2012 World Aids Conference in Washington D.C. this week. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201207270798.html

Early HIV Therapy economically beneficial allafrica.com Thursday 26 July 2012 by Esther Nakkazi

Early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) for adults infected with HIV in rural Sub-Saharan Africa can generate widespread economic benefits, researchers have found. In a study presented today at the XIX International AIDS Conference in Washington DC, United States, researchers from Uganda and the US found that HIV-infected adults with high CD4+ counts - a health status benchmark for HIV-positive people - are able to work on average 30 per cent more hours each day than people with low CD4+ counts. Furthermore, their children's school enrolment rates were 15 per cent higher than those of children with parents showing low CD4+ counts. Although the study's recommendations are good in terms of prevention, they could cause further resistance to drugs because people might not adhere [to treatment programmes] if they are not actually showing signs of HIV-related illness. Read more at: http://allafrica.com/stories/201207270235.html

Vaginal ARV ring on trial, New vision Thursday 26th July 2012 by Anne Mugisha Uganda yesterday launched clinical trials to test the effectiveness and safety of a ring containing an anti-retroviral drug, which is inserted in the vagina to prevent HIV infection in women. If successful, the research in five African countries will give hope to women to get protection against infection without compromising adherence to the drug. Researchers, including doctors from Uganda, the US and the other countries involved in the trials, on Tuesday announced the start of the trial processes during the 19th International AIDS conference in Washington DC. Statistics show that half of the world’s HIV-infected population is female, while in Africa, 60% of the infected adults are women and most of them get it through unprotected sex. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/633414-aids-vaginal-arv-ring-on-trial.html

Focus on pregnant women not enough, Thursday 26th July 2012 by Lauran Neergaard

The AIDS epidemic increasingly is a female one, and women are making the case at the world’s largest AIDS meeting that curbing it will require focusing on poverty and violence, not just pregnancy and pills. Already, women make up half of the world’s HIV infections, and adolescent girls are at particular risk in the hardest-hit parts of the world, UNICEF Deputy Executive Director Geeta Rao Gupta told the International AIDS Conference.Some 4.8 million people ages 15 to 24 are living with HIV, and two-thirds are female. Sexual violence and conditions of poverty that frequently lead to girls leaving school and marrying in their teens. Even in the U.S., infections increasingly are concentrated in poor communities. Here, 1 in 4 people living with HIV is female and most are African-American or Hispanic.Women are the blind spot in the AIDS conversation,’’ she said. Read more at: http://www.boston.com/lifestyle/health/2012/07/26/aids-experts-focus-pregnant-women-not-enough/UdlJ1kCzcon2qgsKLwwYfO/story.html

Uganda field study finds that HIV treatment has not reduced new infections in couples

In an uncomfortable finding for advocates of treatment as prevention, a study of heterosexual couples of differing HIV status in Uganda has found no difference in the rate of HIV infections in the negative partner when the positive partner was taking antiretroviral therapy (ART) and was virally suppressed, when compared to couples where the positive partner was not on treatment. The finding came from an 'in the field' study of HIV patients attending the TASO clinic in Jinja, Uganda, and their spouses or partners. The survey was of 586 patients and their long-term partners, followed for a median of two years. Read more at: http://www.aidsmap.com/Uganda-field-study-finds-that-HIV-treatment-has-not-reduced-new-infections-in-couples/page/2450241/

Timothy Stambs rubbishes UN circumcision program Tuesday 24th July 2012 by Tidi Kwidini

President Robert Mugabe’s personal health advisor, and former cabinet Minister for Health, Timothy Stamps, has rubbished claims from a UN backed study that has concluded that male circumcision reduces HIV transmission. Stamps’ comments come at a time when the country recently embarked on a massive government sponsored foreskin cutting crusade with the hope of lessening the chances of HIV/AIDS transmission. The crusade this year has also seen more than fifty of the country’s male MPs being compelled to go under the knife. Stamps told a Standard journalist that it did not make any difference to the adult prevalence rate. He further stated that the studies undertaken on circumcision had shown that countries such as the US with a higher number of circumcised men had a high HIV prevalence rate.“Instead of channelling funds towards circumcision, the money must be used to save pregnant mothers who die in huge numbers in this country. Read more at: http://www.zimeye.org/?p=58618

Bill Gates pushes for more advances to fight AIDS, Wednesday 25th July 2012 by Betsy Mckay

Much of the conversation at the XIX International AIDS Conference here this week is about how to use science already at hand to "turn the tide" on the 31-year-old pandemic. Over at his foundation's offices a few blocks away, Bill Gates is reaffirming his faith in scientific advances yet to come. "Without much better tools it is not at all realistic to think you can end this epidemic. It's just not realistic," he said in an interview this week. Making proven methods of preventing HIV more widely available such as voluntary male circumcision, which reduces their risk of HIV infection by more than 60%, is critical, he said. Still, of all the developments, he continues to remain most hopeful for a vaccine, without which the epidemic can't be overcome, he says. A recent promising sign: the discovery of 10E8, one of the most potent known antibodies that neutralize most strains of HIV. Read more at: http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10000872396390444840104577549391070706650.html

Liver cancer cases on increase Tuesday July 24, 2012 by Florence Nakaayi

Ten percent of Ugandans are said to be living with chronic hepatitis B infection, an infection that causes liver cancer. This was revealed by the WHO Country advisor Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) surveillance, Dr. Innocent Mwesigye during a health literacy dialogue at Gayaza Catholic playground. The dialogue under the theme, “Engaging Patient and Consumer Organizations to increase Health Literacy levels in Uganda”, was organized by a Community Health And Information Networking. The hepatitis B virus reproduces in liver cells, but the virus itself is not the direct cause of damage to the liver. Hepatitis B is transmitted through sexual intercourse, illicit drug use and exposure to infected blood. It could be primarily be prevented through immunization. “Promoting health literacy is still a challenge in the country because many people do not appreciate the information given, they pretend to know more, leading to miss out on accurate information,” she said. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/633151-liver-cancer-cases-on-increase.html

South African drug trials lead to TB breakthrough The Irish Times - Thursday, July 26, 2012 by BILL Corcoran

A NEW drug combination being tested for the first time in South Africa on people suffering from tuberculosis has proved to be effective in killing 99 per cent of the bacteria within two weeks, early results have shown. The development has been hailed as “very promising” by the trial’s principal investigator, Stellenbosch University’s Dr Andreas Diacon, but he has cautioned that the three-drug cocktail still has many trials to go through before it becomes widely available. “We only tested the drug for two weeks and that is not really long enough for any TB treatment to work,” he warned. Nevertheless, scientists published their test results in medical journal The Lancet this week and presented them at an international Aids conference in Washington DC on Monday. Dr Diacon told local reporters on Monday that the approach to testing the new drug – in combination with other drugs rather than alone – could make it possible to produce a new treatment within five years instead of decades. Read more at: http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/world/2012/0726/1224320827157.html

Marie Stopes stopped, Zambia Daily Mail Thursday July 26, 2012 by Chimwemwe Mwale MARIE Stopes International has been suspended from conducting abortions because of some alleged illegalities detected in the services of the pro-choice organisation. Minister of Health Joseph Kasonde says Marie Stopes has allegedly been conducting illegal abortions because some of them were being done under the authority of one medical doctor. He said at a press briefing in Lusaka yesterday that this was in breach of the Abortion Act of 1972. Northern Province permanent secretary Emmanuel Mwamba and provincial medical officer Jelita Chinyonga were present at the press briefing. Dr Kasonde said the 1972 law requires that three doctors consent to an abortion. One doctor can however only perform an abortion in an emergency. On whether Marie Stopes will face litigation, Dr Kasonde said the “law will take its ordinary course”. He said the team comprising senior medical officials will advise Government on lifting the suspension, after conducting a review of the operations of Marie Stopes. Read more at: http://www.daily-mail.co.zm/?p=9444

HIV scientists release road map for cure, CBS News, Friday 20th July 2012

International AIDS specialists on Thursday released what they call a road map for research toward a cure for HIV - a strategy for global teams of scientists to explore a number of intriguing leads that just might, years from now, pan out. As HIV/AIDS turns 30, doctors see glimmer of cureHIV Cure? Doctors Say Stem Cells Cured Man of AIDS VirusUN report highlights better access to AIDS medication in developing countries "Today's the first step," said French Nobel laureate Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, co-discoverer of the HIV virus who also co-chaired development of the strategy. The announcement came just before the International AIDS Conference begins on Sunday, when more than 20,000 scientists, activists and policymakers gather in the nation's capital with a far different focus: how to dramatically cut the spread of the AIDS virus, what they call "turning the tide" of the epidemic, using some powerful tools already in hand. Read more at: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-57476477-10391704/hiv-scientists-release-road-map-for-cure-todays-the-first-step/

UPDF receives ARVs from Canadian Hebrews, New vision Monday Jul 23, 2012 by Paul Watala

The Hebrew (locally known as Bayudaya) in Uganda have donated 278 cartons of antiretroviral and antibiotic drugs to the Uganda Peoples Defense Forces. The senior presidential advisor on medical matters, Brigadier James Makumbi received the drugs from Dr. Baniru Masaba of Tobin Health Centre in Mbale town. Dr. Masaba handed over the medical package on behalf of Canadian Friend of Pearl of Children executive director, Deborah Rottenberg. Makumbi hailed the Canadian government and decried the ever-increasing number of people from the communities that flock the UPDF health centres to access ARV drugs. The pronouncement of TASO cutting the aid for ARVs has affected piled more pressure on the UPDF as an institution. “Half the drugs we receive are consumed by the surrounding communities. They assume UPDF drugs are stronger and more effective,” Makumbi revealed.He appealed to the masses and UPDF soldiers to be more faithful and practice Zero-grazing as the more effective ways of protecting themselves from being infected with the incurable HIV virus. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/633260-updf-receives-arvs-from-canadian-hebrews.html

Prevent your child from HIV New vision Sunday July 22, 2012 by Agnes Kyotalengerire

Felista Okello, a mother of four, is finding it difficult to care for her five-year-old HIV-positive daughter, Priscilla. “My daughter keeps asking why I have to give her medicine even when she is not sick,” Okello says. “Her appetite is low. Sometimes I force her to eat so that she does not take medication on an empty stomach.” Okello’s biggest worry, however, is how to disclose to Priscilla that she is HIV-positive. According to the Ministry of Health stastistics, about 20,000 to 24,000 children are infected with HIV every year; 76,000 need ARVs and 24,417 are already on treatment. Dr. Barbara Asire, the Prevention of Mother-to-child Transmission Programme manager Baylor-Uganda, says every pregnant mother is screened for HIV. “Children between two and five years with a CD4 count less than 750 cells are started on ARVs. Those above five years with CD4 a count below 350 are started on ARVS, Juma adds.“During the one year of breastfeeding, emphasis is put on treating conditions that make the baby vulnerable, for example, a mother’s cracked nipples.” Read more at http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/633242-prevent-your-child-from-hiv.html

HIV scientists release road map for cure, CBS News, Friday 20th July 2012

International AIDS specialists on Thursday released what they call a road map for research toward a cure for HIV - a strategy for global teams of scientists to explore a number of intriguing leads that just might, years from now, pan out. As HIV/AIDS turns 30, doctors see glimmer of cure HIV Cure? Doctors Say Stem Cells Cured Man of AIDS Virus UN report highlights better access to AIDS medication in developing countries "Today's the first step," said French Nobel laureate Francoise Barre-Sinoussi, co-discoverer of the HIV virus who also co-chaired development of the strategy. The announcement came just before the International AIDS Conference begins on Sunday, when more than 20,000 scientists, activists and policymakers gather in the nation's capital with a far different focus: how to dramatically cut the spread of the AIDS virus, what they call "turning the tide" of the epidemic, using some powerful tools already in hand. Yet one person in the world apparently has been cured: Timothy Ray Brown of San Francisco, who in 2006 was living in Berlin when in addition to his HIV, he got leukemia. Brown underwent a blood stem cell transplant - what once was a bone marrow transplant - to treat the cancer. His own immune system was destroyed. Read more at: http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-504763_162-57476477-10391704/hiv-scientists-release-road-map-for-cure-todays-the-first-step/

Mother dies as negligent midwife sleeps, Daily Monitor Thursday, 12th 2012

The media has been awash with the news that a 24-year-old woman died earlier this week after she succumbed to complications while giving birth. The woman met her end after it was reported the midwife, who was inside a health centre refused to offer professional help because she was resting. The incident was reported in Kibaale District. The woman, identified as Hajara Katusabe, died on Monday night at Isunga Health Centre III. The midwife at the centre was not of any help since relative’s claim she said she was resting after she had had a heavy work load.

Details have not come out of police investigations of the case. The midwife was taken into protective custody owing to the fact that residents had been aroused to punish her for the death of Katusabe. Katusabe's death echoes that of another woman, Hadija Namutebi, in February this year. 29-year-old Namutebi died in Mukono but on that occasion, the negligence was blamed on her husband. This also showed the need for sensitisation of the public with regard to matters of reproductive health. Read more at: http://www.fhri.or.ug/index.php/component/content/article/203.html

Mulago Hospital takes forever to install a donated MRI machine

The officials were appearing before the committee to answer queries raised in the Auditor general’s report for the period ended June 2010. The ministry’s Permanent Secretary, Dr Asuman Lukwago was put on the spot to explain why poor Ugandans continued to be charged expensively for MRI services yet there was a donation to the country.He however says Mulago hospital lacked qualified personnel to operate the machine. Dr Lukwago says that some steps have already been taken to ensure it is installed soon. He adds that the hospital has started arrangements to ensure appropriate space , housing and other essential steps are taken before setting it up, considering all safety measures to avoid any effects. Read more at: http://www.ugpulse.com/uganda-news/health/mulago-hospital-takes-forever-to-install-a-donated-mri-machine/26370.aspx

New Drugs for Mothers with HIV, Daily Monitor, Friday 20th July 2012 by Agatha Ayebazibwe

The government will from October this year administer a new treatment regime for all pregnant mothers living with HIV known as Option B+, in a move aimed at eliminating Mother-to -Child Transmissions (PMTCT). The new drug will replace the administration of the AZT drug to expectant mothers following recommendation by the World Health Organisation in 2011. According to WHO, Option B+ will help offer protection against mother-to-child transmission in future pregnancies, as well as continuing prevention against sexual transmission of the virus in case of discordant partners. Dr. Alex Alex Ario, the acting programme manager for HIV/Aids Control Programme, said at least 90,000 women over the country will be put on this new regime of treatment. The head of research at the Joint Clinical Research Centre, Dr Francis Kiweewa, told Daily Monitor that the current guidelines for PMTCT put a lot of focus on the prevention of HIV transmission from the mother to the child with little focus on the wellbeing of the mother.  Read more at: http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/New+drug+for+mothers+with+HIV/-/688334/1458158/-/107fqkv/-/index.html

Egg therapy for children allergies: what parents should know Friday 20 th July 2012by Kathleen Blanchard

Results of a new study show eating egg protein in small then higher doses could be good therapy for curing children who have allergic reactions if they consume eggs. The idea is that the body can provide its own type of immunotherapy to get rid of food Children who eat small amounts and gradually increased their intake eventually had little or no reaction to eating eggs. The same type of therapy can be used for peanut, milk and other food allergies, based on past findings from Johns Hopkins researchers.

Cholera kills four in Kasese, Newvision, Friday 20th July 2012 by  Masereka Bernard An outbreak of the deadly cholera disease in Bundibugyo district has killed four people leaving over 150 others hospitalized. The epidemic spread to the district from the neighboring Democratic Republic of Congo. The four persons died before being taken to hospitals for medication according to Isaac Bisunga – the district disease surveillance officer. Bisunga says the epidemic broke out last month but only to realize it was cholera last week.  The most affected areas include Bundibugyo town council, Nyahuka town council, Kasithu sub-county, Bukukwanga sub-county, Kisuba sub-county and Bubandi sub-county. Isolation centers have been established at Bundibugyo hospital and Nyahuka health center IV according to the disease surveillance officer. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/633115-cholera-kills-four-in-kasese.html

Nestle health science takes in accera, Inc. to advance potential of Axona, Industrial News releaseFriday 20th July

BROOMFIELD, CO – Accera, Inc., a privately-held, commercial-stage, healthcare company focused on the discovery and development of innovative clinical applications to address acute and chronic neurodegenerative diseases, announced today a partnership with Nestlé Health Science.  Although the terms of the transaction are not being disclosed, Nestlé Health Science will invest in Accera to further support clinical development and commercialization of Axona, a prescription medical food intended for the clinical dietary management of the metabolic processes associated with mild to moderate Alzheimer’s Disease (AD).  Luis Cantarell, President and CEO of Nestlé Health Science S.A., will join the company’s board of directors. “Nestlé Health Science’s investment will enable us to make larger clinical trials and help us strengthen our commercial capabilities in the US. Nestlé Health Science S.A., a wholly owned subsidiary of Nestlé S.A., has been established to target a new opportunity between food and pharmaceuticals.  Operational since January 2011, in conjunction with the establishment of the Nestlé Institute of Health Sciences, its focus is to develop science-based personalized nutritional solutions to address chronic medical conditions such as AD, diabetes, obesity and cardiovascular diseases. Read more at: http://www.healthcarefinancenews.com/press-release/nestlé-health-science-takes-stake-accera-inc-advance-potential-axon

Did family planning pills cause my stroke? New vision Friday July 20th 2012

It was an ordinary morning and all seemed well. My husband left the house for the gym while I catered to the kitchen. My niece, who was living with us, and my son had taken on jobs in town during their holidays so they expected me to take them to work. I went upstairs to prepare myself, but fell down as I entered the dressing room. I tried to shout for help, but lost consciousness. As I was later told; the children waited for me downstairs until they got impatient, sending my son upstairs to see what was wrong. He found me on the floor. Strokes are caused by blockages within blood vessels preventing the flow of blood into the brain. The commonest cause of this blockage is the build-up of fat deposits on the inner walls of blood vessels that supply the brain. This makes the blood vessels narrower and less flexible. When this happens, the blood vessels are more likely to get blocked by blood clots. This leads to lack of blood supply to a certain part of the brain and the affected part eventually dies.

HIV Increase everyday challenges faced by people with disability

Being disabled is a challenge and even more when you become infected with HIV as each day you are faced with social exclusion and rejection. The United Nation notes that the growing relationship between HIV/AIDS and disability is an emerging issue and cause for concern as people with disabilities are at higher risk of exposure to HIV.  The majority of people with disabilities live in Africa where they are vulnerable to HIV/AIDS infection due to sex crimes and insufficient legal protection and education, This was also evidenced in a baseline report presented by Hamida Ismaili Mauto, the country coordinator for Disability, HHIV and AIDS Trust (DHAT), an organization which promotes rights based HIV and AIDS interventions responding to the needs of people with disabilities. Civil society also came under fire for failing to address challenges faced by persons with disabilities in their programs with some organizations blaming it on the high costs incurred in the implementation of such programs. Read more at: http://www.kubatanablogs.net/kubatana/?p=9356

Test tube babies at five million, New vision Monday July 16th, 2012 Five million “test tube babies” have now been born around the world, according to research presented at a conference of fertility experts. Delegates hailed it as a “remarkable milestone” for fertility treatments. The first test tube baby, Louise Brown, was born in the UK in July 1978.  Her mother Leslie Brown died last month. However, delegates at the conference in Turkey warned couples not to use fertility treatment as an “insurance policy” if they delayed parenthood. It said official figures up to 2008, plus three years of estimates, put the total number of test tube babies born at five million.  Icmart chairman Dr. David Adamson said: “This technology has been highly successful in treating infertile patients. Millions of families with children have been created, thereby reducing the burden of infertility. “The technology has improved greatly over the years to increase pregnancy rates.” About 1.5 million cycles of IVF, and similar techniques, are performed every year, resulting in 350,000 babies.   Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/632957-test-tube-babies-at-five-million.htm

Uganda to Make new Aids Drugs New vision Wednesday 08 February 2012 By Taddeo Bwambale and Vivian Agaba.

Quality chemicals a Ugandan pharmaceutical company will next month start producing a new ARV drug (Tenofovir), a monthly dose of this will cost $ 20 as compared to $ 600 for the same drug in Europe. While most advanced countries have switched to Tenofovir, many poor countries have not because it is expensive yet it is a first line treatment for HIV. According to the medical stores general manager Moses Kamabare, the purchase of anti-malarial and ARVs locally has significantly reduced on cases of stock outs and the cost of buying the ARVs from the plant has slightly reduced from $ 2.4 per dose when production began to $ 1.9.

Government offers condolences over nodding disease Daily Monitor, Wednesday February 8, 2012 By Sheila Naturinda

The deputy, leader of government business, Gen. Moses Ali acknowledge that the situation of the nodding disease is mysterious, but said he had asked the Minister of health, Dr. Christine Ondoa to explain and answer all demands made by the political leaders of the Acholi sub region districts where children are affected. The Acholi MPs therefore tabled a bill in parliament demanding that Acholi region be declared a disaster area having; a comprehensive report, creating mobile clinics, a full budget be channeled to the area and intensified research to discover the name and cause of the disease.

Plague outbreak suspected as two die in Arua Daily Monitor, Wednesday February 8 2012 By Felix Warom Okello and Clement Aluma

A fresh outbreak of plague is suspected in Arua after two people died of similar symptoms in Vurra County and the district health officials have put the community on alert, although the DHO of Arua said he is still consulting the details of the disease. The plague outbreaks were from the neighboring DR Congo over the years.

Women circumcised by force, Daily Monitor, Monday, February 13th 2012 by Joseph Aliti

Women who refuse to undergo female genital mutilation in pokot and Tepit communities in Karimoja sub-region are forcibly cut by traditional birth attendants during delivering. This is criminal and I strongly warn who ever has been doing it to stop because they risk ending in prison, State minister for gender Rukiya Nakadama reveals. This practice infringes on women’s rights and causes physical harm thus a threat to their reproductive health. With funds from UNICEF, UNFPA and France government a zero tolerance program was launched in the region last year.

80 nursing students stranded as education minister closes school, Daily Monitor, Monday, February 13th 2012

At least 80 students of Nwoya teaching hospital medical school are stranded after the institute closed following directive from minister of education for allegedly operating illegally. The institute opened last year and its director Dr. Claive Onen collected shs 700,000-800,000 and the students complained that they have not been taught and having a deteriorating standards of living at the school. This was there after followed by the doctor’s arrest.

Uganda facing condom shortage, Daily Monitor, Tuesday, February 14, 2012 by Brian Ssenoga Kimuli.

Uganda needs about 3 billion condoms a year to cater for about 10 million people who are in the active age bracket, health official notes. The country has been importing about 120 million condoms annually in the last five years, but this figure is way beyond the current demand. Dr.Mina Ssali, the Public Relations Officer Uganda Cares says National Condom day comes on February 14th Valentine’s Day which is an ideal day to encourage condom use when love and lust are high.

Israel to support health services in Uganda, New vision, Monday, February 13th 2012 by vision reporter

The new Israel ambassador to Uganda has disclosed that his ministry will support Uganda’s health ministry in establishing vibrant ambulance service in the country. Ambassador Gil Heskel said this during his visit to Uganda emphasizing that Israel is willing to strengthen co-operation with Uganda in many areas, health being one of them.

Maternal Child care project launched, Daily Monitor, Tuesday, February 14, 2012 by Paul Bishanga

A five year maternal and childcare health project has been launched in Kabale district. Dr. Geoffrey Anguyo, a senior health official said 200-bed hospital will be constructed and six ambulances will be purchased to enable the transportation of mothers from the rural areas. Dr. Francis Mwesigye Runumi therefore cautions health workers against laxity in their work.

More ARV centre’s needed, Daily Monitor, Tuesday February 14, 2012, by Joseph Mugisha

The limited number of health centre’s that offer ARV services in the Rwenzori region is hindering  the efforts to cater for people living with HIV Aids. The 41 facilities in the region are not enough and the facilities are poor due to poor facilities and poor staff remunerations the Kyegegwa District Chairman Norman Birungi says.

Embrace new health system, New vision, Monday, February 13th 2012 by Rukia Nakamatte.

The ministry of health working closely with the United States Agency International Development (USAID) and IntraHealth, have developed the human resources for health a tool that can avail you with reliable information on health workers which will provide accurate data and sufficient system for the flow of information. More than 60% of the health workers are in urban areas serving less than 20% of the population yet 80% of these live in rural areas. The new system will therefore provide data on available health workers, their distribution and their productivity. This system will also provide reliable and complete evidence for health work force planning, recruitment, deployment and payroll management.

Health Ministry to demolish 100 theatres, Daily Monitor, Wednesday, February 15th 2012 by Agatha Ayebazibwe

More than 100 theatres at the lower health units built at Shs 100 million each will face demolition while others are to be rehabilitated. These facilities were built to boost healthcare at health centre IVs and their demolition could mean a loss of at least shs10b spent on construction, minus the cost of demolition. The theaters are in Kihihi, Kabale, Sironko, Mubende, Mbarara, Kiruhura, Lira Masaka and Hoima, although these structures remained unused because they did not meet basic standards both in design and structure.

Mulago cancer Institute gets shs 27m,  New vision, Wednesday, February 15th 2012 by Violet Natabanzi and Vivian Agaba

The Uganda Cancer Institute in Mulago Hospita receives over 27M shs for prostate cancer research. The director of Uganda Cancer Institute Jackson Orem said no research had been done on prostate cancer in Uganda since 1965 and many men with such cases report late for diagnosis which makes it that out of the 100 diagnosed with cancer, 80 die after a year.

Mulago rehabilitation plan released, New vision, Thursday, February 16th February 2012 by John Odyek and Joyce Namutebi

Parliament has approved a $73M (shs168b) from African Development bank and $15M (shs 35b) from the Nigeria Trust Fund to improve health services at Mulago referral hospital and two city hospitals. Dr. Richard Ndahuura minister for health said this project would be implemented over 54-month period and it is designed to redirect the high demand for basic healthcare that currently congests at Mulago. This will also support establishment of two new secondary health facilities at Makindye and Kawempe.

US govt boosts health drive for UPDF, New vision, Thursday, February 16th   2012 by Raymond Baguma

The US embassy in Kampala has donated three mobile surgical unit, three vans, four trucks with tents and surgical gear worth sh1.8b to be used in safe Medical circumcision by the Uganda Peoples Defence Forces. Observing that SMC does not provide 100% protection against HIV/AIDS, the US ambassador Jerry Lanier urged surgical teams to always tell their clients of other ways to minimize the risk of contracting the virus. These teams will also help the UPDF meet its bold goal of circumcising 60,000 men over the next three years.   

14-year-old Arua mum fighting for life, New vision, Thursday, February 16th 2012 by Richard Drasimaku

A 14-year old mother who underwent a caesarean section at Nebbi Hospital last month is stranded at Arua Hospital in critical condition. According to a medical report, part of the girl’s abdomen was left with a gaping wound and Arua Hospital doctors said some of her internal organs were cut during the caesarean section.

Kasese district records 30 new cholera cases , New vision, Thursday, February 2012 by Benard Masereka.

A cholera outbreak in Bukonzo west constituency in Kasese district has hit another low point since it was first reported in October. Last Thursday, 30 cases were reported to the Cholera treatment centres and a meeting by the district leaders resolved that the sale of all food stuffs be banned immediately and heads of households without latrines be arrested and public latrines be dug to curb this. It was also observed that inadequate water supply in the affected area had made it hard for the residents to maintain a good sanitation in the area.

Kalungu gets Shs 4b Aids hospital, Daily Monitor, Thursday, February 16 2012 by Brian Ssenoga Kimuli

A state-of-the art hospital for specialized treatment of people living with HIV/Aids in Lukaya Town, Kalunga district to eradicate HIV/Aids scourge in Uganda got a boost yesterday after Uganda Cares NGO announced its construction. The facility is expected to offer free treatment to about 30,000 HIV/Aids patients a year. A survey done last year by ministry of health in the district found the prevalence rate here to be very high at 12%, while testing and counseling services are relatively low and only 38% of the people know their status. This is therefore a move to increase access to HIV/Aids services.

Nodding disease cause unknown-expert New vision Friday February 17, 2012 by Anne Mugisha

A US-based health expert has arrived in Uganda to help find more clues on the cause of the nodding disease epidemic in Northern Uganda. Dr. Scott Dowell told journalists that numerous tests done at the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) Atlanta in US have not revealed much about the disease. However, two strong leads being followed have connection to river blindness (Onchocerciasis), low serum concentration and low Vitamin B6 was detected too. Serum is the blood component which does not contain the white blood cells or the clotting factor. The affected people 95% of whom are children 5-15 years will be treated with epileptic drugs.

Project to reduce maternal, child mortality starts in Kibaale, New vision, Friday, February 17 2012 Ismael Kasooha

The infectious disease has launched a one year project code named “Saving Mothers Giving Life” at reducing the death of mothers and new-born babies in Kibaale district with support from the US. Edward Kyagulany the project coordinator said the project will ensure that all expectant mothers get obstetric care while giving birth in all health facilities in Kibaale. This intervention followed data indicating 450 mothers out of every 100,000 die annually due to complications in delivering. The mothers will be supported with incentives like transport to and fro the health centre’s, nutrition foods, baby kits and treated mosquito nets.

CSM Vaccinations in upper East region GBC News 24th Friday February 2012

Following reports of an outbreak of Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis, CSM, in the Upper East Region which claimed 16 lives, the Director of Health Services, Dr. Awoonor Williams says vaccination exercises are ongoing by health workers to help eradicate the disease. Speaking on GBC's Current Affairs Programme 'Behind the News', Dr. Williams said people with the disease should report early to health centres for treatment.  He said most people with the disease resort to other places for a cure instead of health centers. Read more at: http://www.gbcghana.com/index.php?id=1.795674

Poorly processed peanut butter causes cancer, New Vision, Thursday February23rd2012 by Prossy Nandudu

Consumption of poorly processed peanut butter can cause Cancer of the Liver, according to a research done by Makerere University in partnership with the University of Georgia. Dr. A. Achilleo Kaaya, the lead researcher from the faculty of Food Science and Technology, said most of the groundnuts are contaminated during the harvest and storage process. The problem has been compounded further by the processors who mix the quality groundnuts with the dirty and rotten ones while grinding. 'Directly looking at peanut butter, it is not easy to see the aflotoxins. Unfortunately, any of the methods we use for preparing the nuts, cooking, roasting, cannot remove the toxins because they are chemicals. Their melting point is 300 degrees Celsius,' Kaaya added. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629214-poorly-processed-peanut-butter-causes-cancer.html

Nodding disease centre set in Pader, New Vision,Wednesday, February 22 2012 by Petride Mudoola.

Government should establish a vector control centre in Pader district in order to get rid of the nodding disease within the area, the LC5 Pader District Alfred Akena has advised. Over 200 children have so far died of the mysterious disease in northern Uganda. Ministry of Health reported early this month that it had recorded 66 deaths as a result of the disease. The number has since more than tripled. Recent studies done by the health ministry and the Centre for Disease Control did not indicate any conclusive causes of the nodding disease but established that the number of children infected with the disease had  risen to over 3,000 from 2,000 reported at the beginning of this year. “Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629174-nodding-disease-vector-control-centre-vital-in-pader.html

Food joints shut after poisoning, Daily Monitor, Wednesday, February 22, 2012 by Simon Peter Emwamu

Food joint owners in Bugondo Sub-county in Serere District are pondering their next move after residents and LC3 chairpersons demolished their business premises over alleged poisoning. The demolition done on Monday comes a day after the residents and the sub-county council resolved that the food spots were being hired by unscrupulous individuals to poison people. “We have discovered that these people are being used, and to safeguard our lives it was inevitable to stop them from doing business,” Mr Okurut said. Mr Apollo Ewidu, the area LC3 chairman, said the vice is on the rise following endless land wrangles in the area. “We shall not allow these people to operate, unless they reveal to us who are the master minders of this act,” he added. Read more at: http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/-/688334/1332382/-/b08n02z/-/index.html

Nodding disease confounds experts- kill’s children, Agency France Press, Wednesday, February 22 2012

Anywar is one of more than 3,000 children in northern Uganda who are suffering from a debilitating mystery ailment known as nodding disease, which has touched almost every family in the village of Tumangu. For several years, scientists have tried and failed to determine the cause of the illness, which locals say has killed hundreds of youngsters. The disease affects only children and gradually devastates its victims through debilitating seizures, stunted growth, wasted limbs, mental disabilities and sometimes starvation. Scientists are trying to find a cure: since 2010, researchers ranging from epidemiologists to environmental experts, neurologists, toxicologists and psychiatrists have carried out a range of tests. Read more at: http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/nodding-disease-confounds-experts-kills-children-178523&cp

1200 Namugongo residents get free treatment New Vision Tuesday February 21, 2012 by Elvis Kyotalengerire

. Dr. Nicholas Wooding, the acting vice-chancellor of IHSU, said they offered free health care services and treatment to the low-income residents of Namuwongo as part of their corporate social responsibility. “We realized the people in Namugongo community suffer many common illnesses because they cannot afford and access treatment. Besides, majority lack knowledge on proper hygiene,” Wooding said. “We could not work in isolation. We provided the manpower and a number of organisations, including International Medical Group, National Drug Authority, Joint Medical Stores, Kampala Pharmaceuticals Limited and Quality Chemicals sponsored. Read more at http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629115-1-200-namuwongo-residents-get-free-treatment.html

Mpigi residents wants more HIV/AIDS Education New Vision Tuesday February 21, 2012 by Elvis Basudde

Residents of Buyiga Island, Kammengo sub-county in Mpigi district have asked government to intensify HIV/AIDS an awareness campaign in the area.It is presumed many people living on the island hold strong convictions on HIV/AIDS."We still carry myths and misconceptions about HIV/AIDS. People are hesitant to have HIV tests because they are not sensitized," said Betty Nabwanika of Buyiga A. Participants revealed that during HIV testing in community outreaches, clients are not given enough counselling. And as a result, people who test HIV positive find their health deteriorating immediately. They noted that it discourages other community members from testing for the virus Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629159-mpigi-residents-want-more-hiv-aids-education.html

Infertility- an advantage against prostate cancer, Daily Rx, Tuesday, February 21 2012By Travis Gidding

Children are the future, as they say. But new research into prostate cancer shows, maybe your children says something about your future too. A doctor in Sweden has recently published his thesis, showing that infertile - or what he calls "sub fertile" - men may have half the risk of prostate cancer of men who have at least one child. In a study examining the connection between fertility and prostate cancer risk, Yasir Ruhayel, M.D., from Lund University and Skane University Hospital compared 450 men with prostate cancer against a control group of 450 men without prostate cancer. The link between sub fertility and reduced prostate cancer risk was stronger than other common risk factors including diet, smoking, alcohol use or disease, according to this study. Read more at: http://www.dailyrx.com/news-article/prostate-cancer-risk-and-male-infertility-linked-17696.html

Patients to continue nodding as funds delay, Daily Monitor, Tuesday, February 21, 2012  by Harriet Anena

Thousands of children suffering from nodding disease in northern Uganda will continue to wait for a comprehensive intervention with the ministry of health still unsure of when the Shs 7 billion requested for from Finance will be released. The available Shs 100 million mobilised through reallocations from Health Ministry is the only funding being used in the affected districts of Kitgum, Lamwo, and Pader, where the nodding disease has affected 3,000 children and killed 200.The delay in training health workers to handle the nodding symptoms and unavailable money could only mean more suffering for the children and parents most of whom are suffering to keep their children alive.

Koboko couple loses baby, files complaint against health centre. Daily Monitor, Tuesday, February 21 2012 by Peter Aliga & Felix Warom Okello.

Yossa Mambo has lodged a complaint against a health centre in Yumbe District with the Uganda Human Rights Commission in Arua following the death of his baby during a caesarian operation of his wife. Mambo said his baby’s life could have been saved, but when his wife and him reached Lodonga hospital, the nurse only examined his wife after he realized her condition had worsened and rushed her to Yumbe hospital. The baby’s head was cut during the operation and the body removed, medical reports show that the woman had a ruptured uterus.

Patience cry foul as X-ray machine idle Daily Monitor Tuesday February 21 2012 by Denis Ongeng.

Patients in Apac are paying at least Shs20, 000 for x-ray services in private clinic because the Shs 400m hospital X-ray machine has not been working for months. The patients said that it has become expensive for them to access the services in a private facility. The hospital health officer said the machine lacks chemicals to produce pictures on the X-ray films. One patient who broke his leg in an accident last year said he spent 50,000 on X-ray machines.

Obama’s health visits, New Vision, Monday February, 20th 2012 by John Odyek

The Executive Director of US President Barack Obama's Global Health Initiative (GHI) Lois Quam arrives in Uganda today (Monday) for a one week visit to support the Ministry of Health's effort to reduce maternal deaths by 50 percent in four western districts by the end of 2012.According to ministry of health and other health experts, the common causes of death among pregnant mothers are over bleeding, infection, obstructed labour, abortion, pregnancy related hypertension and compounding factors that include malaria and HIV/Aids disease. Only one in four girls have access to contraceptives, and 50 percent of all pregnancies are unintended, resulting in the deaths of around 16 Ugandan mothers each day. Uganda has a shortfall of 2000 midwives who are critical to reduce maternal mortality as pregnant mothers must deliver with a skilled attendant according to the Uganda Nations Fund (UNFPA) for Population Activities. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629135-obama-s-health-official-visits.html

Arthritis: How to tell your child is affected, New Vision , Tuesday, Monday February 20 2012 by Viqué-Ocean Kahinju

According to health experts, this could be juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, a form of arthritis that may result in joint pain and swelling. They add that arthritis is common among the elderly, but children too can suffer from it although it is rare. Dr. Phillip Besimire, a paediatrician at St. Xavier Child Care Centre, says juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is prevalent in children aged less than 16 years. Symptoms Similar to other forms of arthritis, the symptoms often flash up and disappear, but sometimes can be persistent. A child may have difficulty walking or stretching the limbs. The cause is not specific, but Besimire says the condition occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the cells and tissues, leading to inflammation of the muscles and joints. It is mainly triggered by infections caused by a virus or bacteria. Untreated rheumatoid arthritis causes persistent joint pain, muscle swelling and stiffness, which affects growth body movements, usually resulting in disfigurement or deformities. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629125-arthritis-how-to-tell-your-child-is-affected.html

Bugiri Hospital suffers brain drain, New vision, Friday February 24th 2012, by Frederick Womakuyu

From the Bugiri-Malaba highway, Bugiri hospital appears to be a deserted facility. The tin roofs hovering over the facility are rusted, its doors broken down and the infrastructure is dilapidated. But coming closer to the facility, you see a number of patients are lining up for different services. This is around 9:00am in the morning. However, a keen look around the facility reveals absence of the senior workers — the medical superintendent, the administrator and junior cadres, are yet to show up. I am told to wait. Within half an hour, the administrator shows up but she tells me to wait as she attends to the Resident District Commissioner of Bugiri, who had also showed up to check on the facility.The facility is also supposed to have three doctors but only two are available — the third went to Nairobi, Kenya for further studies. However, Nabulime fears that when he completes his studies, he is also likely to look for greener pastures elsewhere. Nabulime has lost count of the number of doctors from Bugiri hospital who enrol for further studies but never return. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629245-bugiri-hospital-suffers-brain-drain.html

Osire Isaac: a light to hopeless children, New vision, Monday February 27th 2012 by Frederick Womakuyu

Little Alistera Alowo lay in pain on her bed, a mat spread on the earthen floor covered by a mosquito net that protected her open wound on the head from the marauding flies. Blood oozed from the wound as flesh also fell from her head. Set in an isolated hut with an open roof to allow in fresh air, a despicable stench fills the room. She looks tired, restless and hungry. Her wound is dirty, her family had been using motor vehicle oil to treat it, since they escaped from Mbale Hospital six months ago over unpaid bills. Unable to afford the cost of medical care, the family dumped Alistera in an isolated hut, treating her with herbs and oil in the hope that the 9-year-old girl will recover. Alistera has had to lose some body parts. Three quarters of her head is rotting and the entire outer skin has fallen off exposing her skull. Her ear was eaten off by an infection and it was buried the day I visited. I visited Alistera recently at her home in Paya sub-county in Tororo district, courtesy of Dr. Isaac Osire, an ordinary but exceptional Ugandan, who has devoted his time and personal resources to help disabled children whose families cannot afford the cost of medical care. Using his own money, the Alistera’s condition, none of them was willing to offer their vehicle to transport her. Read more at http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629269-osire-isaac-a-light-to-hopeless-children.html

Menstruation keeps girls away from school. Newvision Monday February 20th2012 by Godfrey Ojore

Among the hygiene related problems in Katakwi primary schools is lack of pads by the girl child during menstruation.“There is high drop out of girls from school in the district due to lack of sanitary pads for girls,” Damali Asekenye the District Community Development Officer said. She also attributed this problem to lack of knowledge among the parents on how to handle girls when they start their menstruation. She appealed to school administrators to create innovations towards the making of local pads to help girls from poor families. “We shall continue loosing girls from school if we don’t think twice. You need to create avenues of bringing parents on board on this matter,” Asekenye advised. Asekenye was speaking during a one day training of head teachers and teachers from 15 primary schools selected by Water Aid to champion issues of water, hygiene and sanitation The participants agreed to form health clubs in their respective schools to foster issues of sanitation for both school and the community. “I hope to start involving my children to do charity work for the community. The project is very good and I pray it will create great impact among the pupils and teachers,” John Okot the headmaster of Akoboi primary school said.

Nodding: MPs task govt to find cash Daily Monitor Wednesday   February 29th 2012 by Yasin Mugerwa

The government has ordered the Ministry of Health to divert about Shs1b meant for malaria control to help hundreds of children in northern Uganda who are dying from the nodding disease. The revelation made by Junior Health Minister Richard Nduhura in Parliament yesterday, angered legislators across the political spectrum, who accused the government of neglecting thousands of sick children in northern Uganda and went on to reject the minister’s proposal. The diversion of malaria funds came on a day Parliament debated the plight of the sick children in the north in an emotional debate in which lawmakers accused the government of discriminating against the people of northern Uganda, a claim government denied. Realising that there was no money for nodding disease in the supplementary budget to be debated, Rukiga MP Jack Sabiiti moved a motion without notice, for Parliament to compel the government to find money for research and feeding the nodding children through a supplementary within two days.  Ms Cerinah Nebanda proposed an amendment to the motion that no supplementary budget should be passed without that of the nodding disease. Deputy Speaker Jacob Oulanyah, who also represents one of the affected areas, said: “I cannot hold this motion, the issue of nodding disease is an emergency and the motion doesn’t violate any provision of the Constitution. Read more at http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/-/688334/1356062/-/axwubvz/-/index.html

Foreigners to get free treatment for HIV, The Sun Wednesday February 29th 2012 By Staff Reporter.

Migrants are currently barred from the service. But ex-Tory cabinet minister Lord Fowler has called for free treatment to be extended to those who have been in Britain for six months.  Foreign students, workers and trafficking victims are among those expected to benefit.  The Department of Health said that safeguards would be introduced to prevent "health tourism". The move comes amid concerns about rising levels of HIV infections and the cost to the NHS of not treating it early. Foreigners are thought not to seek help because it is so costly. Public Health Minister Anne Milton said: "This measure will protect the public and brings HIV treatment into line with all other infectious diseases.”Treating people with HIV means they are very unlikely to pass the infection on to others. "Tough guidance will ensure this measure is not abused." It would bring England into line with Scotland and Wales, where foreigners can already receive free treatment for HIV. Professor Jane Anderson, chairwoman of the British HIV Association, said: "This is good news for people living in the UK who are HIV positive and also for public health in general." Read more at:http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/4160496/Foreigners-to-get-free-treatment-for-HIV-on-the-NHS.html

Nodding victims in Mulago Sunday Vision Sunday February 4th 2012 by Wokorac Oboi and Raymond Baguma.

Over 25 children suffering from mysterious nodding disease were transferred from Kitgum to Mulago National Referral Hospital. Dr Byarugaba Batera the Executive Director of Mulago said they would be handled as medical investigations continue to be carried out. He said they would take off blood samples, carryout urine tests, as well as CT scan examinations. On Friday the government and the World Health Organisation announced a plan to respond to the disease, which will be coordinated by the office of the prime minister. The plan includes bi annual mass treatment of river blindness, increased surveillance, multivitamin and multi-nutrient supplementation and research into the disease.

Child birth now painful, Sunday Vision Sunday February 4th 2012 by Robert Atuhairwe

76 Kaahwa Adereda a mother of nine and a resident of Kiganda cell of Hoima Municipality says today mothers are told to go with gloves and pay fees, yet back then, all the services were free in the hospitals. It is becoming hard for the poor to have children leading to high infant mortality rate. While Jaon Kiiza 29, a mother of four and a resident of Park cell, Kahoora division says giving birth today is troubling than she saw her mother 20 years ago. Hearing a woman had been operated was rare, unlike today where many deliveries in hospital are by C-section.

Kenyan health sector stares at crisis as nurses retire. Daily Monitor Thurseday February 1st 2012 by Edith Fortunate and Gatonye Gathura

More than 13,000 public nurses are set to retire next year, throwing the already under staffed health regime in major personnel crisis. This will be part of the country wide staff shortage in the civil service of those who will turn 60 years. A similar crisis was shaping in the civil service four years ago, but to buy time, the government raised the retirement age to 60 years from 55 with the first of this bunch expected to retire next year. A national survey on the ages of nurses carried out by the ministry of health found out that  more than 14,000 were over 54 in 2007 and thus are eligible to retire by next year.

Diaspora to raise money for nodding disease Daily Monitor Tuesday February 28th 2012 by Monitor Team

A group of Ugandans living in the UK are planning to raise funds this Saturday to aid research into the nodding disease that has for the past three years baffled the experts. The group said they are dissatisfied with the governments what they termed as lukewarm response to tackling the disease that has killed at least 200 children in Northern Uganda. The organizers said funds will support social care demands faced by families affected by the disease.

American charity equips Manafwa with medical aid, Newvision Monday April 02 2012 by Joseph Wanzusi

Healthcare services in Manafwa district are expected to improve after the district received an assortment of medical supplies worth US $500,000 (about sh1.26b) from Kissito Healthcare International (KHI) an American charity organisation. Handing over the equipment that included a state-of-the-art neonatal incubator, the Kissito USA project manager Clarissa Clarke said the donation is to enhance health care services at Bugobero Health Centre IV and cut down on referral cases from the district. She added that since hiring a doctor and making Bugobero health centre theatre operational in June last year, about 190 general anaesthesia surgeries including many emergency caesarean operations have been carried out thereby contributing to the decrease of maternal and newborn mortality rates in Manafwa district. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630042-American-charity-equips-Manafwa-with-medical-aid.html

CoRSU Hospital Kisubi set to start special surgeries, Newvision Sunday April 01 2012 by Gladys Kalibbala

It is good news for patients who have been flying abroad for special surgeries like hip surgery and knee implants. Now such medical procedures will be handled at the newly opened private ward at CoRSU hospital in Kisubi on the way to Entebbe.  Aloysius Kaganda Bakidde, the president, CoRSU Executive Board explains that since these services will be paid for, the income generated from the private wing will be used in assisting with the surgeries on children with disabilities. He says CoRSU which started operations in 2009 is the only hospital in Uganda currently offering significantly subsidized services to children with physical disability. “We intend to see that people with disability in Uganda are able to access rehabilitation services that improve their quality of life and that they are fully integrated in society,” he explains. Bakidde urged government to come out and address around physical disabilities where he believes 80% of physically disabilities in Uganda that occur in children can be prevented, reduced or cured through timely interventions. “The alternatives of complications that are not curable in the knees or hips are treated by replacing them,” he says.

Last group of nodding disease children discharged Newvision Friday March 29th 2012 by Violet Nabatanzi

The last group of children suffering from nodding disease has been discharged from Mulago national referral hospital. "They are expected to report to the treatment centres for follow up documents before returning to their homes," the hospital's spokesperson Dan Kimosho said. The hospital will continue to work closely with the ministry of health to monitor the affected children but from the established centres. One of the children who had a problem of brain trauma underwent a successful operation, Kimosho confirmed. Before this last group, Mulago had discharged about 20 children who were suffering from the same disease. The screening and treatment centres are in Kitgum, Pader and the other affected districts.  Nodding disease is believed to be a new type of disorder characterized by head-nodding episodes that consist of the repetitive dropping forward of the head.  So far over 3000 children, mainly boys between the ages of five and 15 have been affected with 170 reported dead. The germ which causes river blindness also causes epilepsy in children.   According to research by the World health Organization (WHO) the affected region lies within an area where river blindness is prevalent. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629956-Last-group-of-nodding-disease-children-discharged.html

Sleep for good health looks  Newvision Tuesday March 27th 2012 by Vicky Wandawa

Rose Okot, a general physician at Mulago Hospital, warns that lack of sleep not only makes you look and feel at your worst, but can also lead to ill health.“Adults require at least eight hours of sleep. You can tell when you are not getting enough sleep. Irritability and moodiness are among the first signs.”

She warns of less concentration at work. “You may fall into micro sleeps of about five or more seconds during an activity, which may make you seem unprofessional. The need for more sleep is the body’s natural way of alerting us that you do not sleep enough.”Okot says during sleep, the body repairs its cells and also fights infections. She says: “Insufficient sleep, therefore, makes one more susceptible to colds, flu and other infections.” Other signs of insufficient sleep include depression, anxiety, irritability, mood swings, reduced ability to deal with stress, forgetfulness and poor judgment.

Until one gets enough sleep, they usually do not realise how much the lack of it has affected them. Clare Nabwiso, an auditor, says it was only when she started getting enough sleep that she realised how restless she had become. “Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629913-Sleep-for-good-health--looks.html

37% Ugandan sex workers are HIV positive Newvision Saturday March 24th 2012 by Joyce Nyakato

New research published in The Lancet, an international medical journal, has revealed that commercial sex workers in Uganda have one of the highest rates of HIV infections in the world. Some 99,878 female sex workers in 50 countries (14 in Asia, four in Eastern Europe, 11 in Latin America and the Caribbean, one in the Middle East and 20 in Africa), were subjects in the study conducted between January 1, 2007 and June 25, 2011. Results of the study, which was led by Dr. Stefan Baral of the US-based John Hopkins School of Public Health, were released on Thursday. The study, which assessed the burden of HIV compared to that of other women of reproductive age, found that the burden is disproportionately high and concluded that there is an urgent need to scale up access to quality HIV prevention programs for sex workers. State minister for ethics and integrity Fr. Simon Lokodo agrees that like all Ugandans, sex workers have a right to HIV treatment and attention. “However, giving them the leeway to operate as a business is too much to ask from the Government,” he said. partners as clients,” Stefan wrote. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629853-37--Ugandan-sex-workers-are-HIV-positive.html

New study shows D.C female condom program highly effective HIV infections Anguilla News by Kiki Kalkstein

Great news! Yesterday, a new study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health showed that the female condom program in Washington, D.C., is highly effective in preventing HIV infection. These findings are cause for excitement as they affirm the importance of female condoms in preventing HIV and other STIs and unintended pregnancies in the U.S. and around the world. We know that investing in female condoms is the right thing to do and now we have additional data to continue to make the case for female condoms as a cost effective prevention intervention. These findings are significant for female condom advocates as we continue to face challenges from decision makers regarding the cost effectiveness of female condoms. The analysis concluded that the program, executed through a public-private partnership between the D.C. Department of Health, Female Health Company, and CVS/Caremark, produced significant cost-savings and “prevented enough infections in its first year to save more than $8 million in future medical costs over and above the cost of the program.” The study also showed that the female condom is an excellent public health investment and that provision and promotion of the female condom, especially in high HIV prevalence geographic areas, deserves a place in the HIV prevention toolkit. Read more at:

http://www.anguillanews.com/enews/index.php/permalink/4240.html

Vaccine to prevent heart attacks: study DawnCom

A team headed by Prof Prediman Shah from Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in the United States and Prof Nilsson from Lund University in Sweden, along with a team of other researchers, claim that a vaccine is being developed to prevent heart attacks. Scientists believe that the vaccine could be made available to the public in five years, according to a report published in The Indian Express. The study states that the formation of fatty plaques in blood vessels is one of the main reasons which cause heart attacks. The experiments conducted by a team of scientists prove that it is possible to change the way human immune system reacts to plaques present in the arteries. The experiments also show that the vaccines can reduce the inflammation and severity of the formation of plaques. The team has successfully developed a formula for the vaccine which can reduce the plaque formation by 60 to 70 per cent in mice and the vaccine currently awaits regulatory clearance for clinical trials.http://www.dawn.com/2012/04/02/vaccine-to-prevent-heart-attacks-study.html

Over 10 million Ugandans lack access to safe water, New vision Thursday March 22 by Godfrey Ojore

As the world marks World Water Day today, close to a quarter of Uganda’s population lack access to safe water, according to research by Water Aid Uganda.Most of those without access either live in hard-to-reach areas or parts of the country that have been affected by war.Speaking during the launch of Water Aid/EU funded post-conflict project in Soroti, Alice Anukur, the country representative Water Aid Uganda said they are intervening to rescue communities from such places.“The project we are launching has a goal of equitable and sustainable access to safe water, improved sanitation and hygiene for poor communities in post conflict areas of Uganda,.“In Napak, water coverage is at 49% while sanitation is less than 10%. This points to the need for greater emphasis on sanitation improvement in the district with appropriate approaches,” Anukur explained.http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629797-over-10-million-ugandans-lack-access-to-safe-water.html

Pallisa closes eating places. New vision, Wednesday, March 21, 2012. By Lawrence Okwakol.

The Pallisa deputy resident commissioner, Ambrose Onoria, has suspended all eating kiosks and drinking joints in Kabwangasi sub-county. This was after the acting district health officer, Dr. David Okoth, disclosed that there was a cholera outbreak in Doko village, in Kabwangasi sub-county last week.   Dr. Okoth said the first victim got cholera after eating food from a kiosk on Budaka-Mbale Road. The victim was later rushed to Busiu Treatment centre in Mbale district where he was treated and discharged.Four other people from Doko village contracted the disease and were admitted to Namatala Treatment Centre in Mbale Municipality. Dr. Okoth advised people to practise good hygiene like washing hands with clean water after visiting the toilet and drinking boiled water from recommended water sources. He also advised them to avoid eating from roadside kiosks. http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629782-pallisa-closes-eating-places.html

Water Aid launches WASH magazine New vision, Thurseday March 22nd 2012 by Agnes Kyotalengerirekyo.

WaterAid Uganda has launched a water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) magazine.  The magazine was launched by water and environment minister, Maria Mutagamba to mark this year’s international Women’s Day at the Media Centre in Kampala. Speaking at the launch, Mutagamba stressed that women and girls had a right to healthy, secure and dignified life. The magazine aims at empowering women and girls through improved access to water, sanitation and hygiene services. It has inspiring stories about issues, challenges women and girls in the East African region face due to lack of access to water. WaterAid’s head of policy, Rebecca Alowo, said easy access to simple facilities and washrooms is important, especially for adolescent girls to stay in school and reach their potential. Alice Anukur, WaterAid’s country representative, said the magazine will be published annually.  Apart from inspiring girls and women, the magazine will also show different ways in which girls and women can access WASH services. Phttp://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629781-wateraid-launches-wash-magazine.htmlublish Date: Mar 21, 2012

HIV Rate Drops in Northern Uganda Daily Monitor Monday March 19th 2012 by Flavia Lanyero

The HIV/Aids prevalence in northern Uganda has significantly dropped from 8.2 per cent to 5.7 per cent despite the hard times the region has been going through. Five years ago, the region now in the recovery process, had one of the highest rates which was blamed on the long-running armed conflict, which forced thousands into internally displaced people’s camps.A preliminary Aids Indicator Survey 2011 released on Friday in Kampala shows that the Mid-North, North-East, East-Central and Kampala had between 5 and 7 per cent prevalence rates. Dr Alex Opio, the lead researcher, who is also the assistant Commissioner for National Disease Control, yesterday said this was a preliminary analysis that did not capture the causes of the drop and increase.It is only mid-eastern and West Nile regions that had less than five percent prevalence. The mid-eastern districts: Kapchorwa, Bukwo, Mbale, Bududa, Manafwa, Tororo, Butaleja, Sironko, Pallisa, Budaka and Busia have 3.7 per cent prevalence. West Nile comprising Moyo, Adjumani, Yumbe, Arua, Koboko,

Bananas key in men’s sexuality, New vision Monday 12th 2012 by Agnes Kyotalengerire

Many people eat bananas simply because they are sweet. But did you know that they are loaded with nutrients? Nutritionists say bananas are rich in potassium, fibre, iron, zinc, sodium, carbohydrates as well as vitamins B6, A, C, B1, B2 and E. Geoffrey Babughirana, a dietician at World Vision, recommends that men, especially, take three small-size bananas or one medium-size bogoya (cavendish) daily. He says the black tiny seeds in the midrib are rich in zinc and Vitamin E, which boost men’s sexual ability, sperm count and sperm speed.  “The potassium and sodium content in bananas regulates the body’s water balance. The more potassium one has, the more fluid there is in the body, hence preventing dehydration,” observes, Alex Mukori, a nutritionist. “For instance, if one has diarrhoea and takes bananas, they help replace the lost fluid.”Bananas are also excellent stress busters, due to their high potassium content, Mukori explains.

District health officer arrested for stealing drugs Newvision Monday March 26th 2012 by Frederick Kiwanuka

The Nakaseke District Health Officer, Dr.Badru Sessimba has been arrested in an ongoing operation by State House to curb misappropriation of funds and theft of drugs in the district’s health department.Sessimba was arrested on Saturday by a team of security personnel from the presidential medical and health service delivery monitoring unit over allegations of financial impropriety and abuse of office.The arrest followed a month of investigations during which the operation team detectives visited several health units in the district.Another male nurse at Nakaseke Hospital, David Sekiranda was nabbed with drugs and medical equipped worth over 30m three months ago.Moses Talemwa, a detective attached to the team, said Sessimba allegedly diverted millions of shillings which were meant for implementing health services in the Nakaseke.Among other allegations, Sessimba is accused of having misappropriated funds which were meant for immunization. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629876-district-health-officer-arrested-for-stealing-drugs.html

37% Ugandan sex workers are HIV positive, Newvision Saturday March 24th 2012 by Joyce Nyakato

New research published in The Lancet, an international medical journal, has revealed that commercial sex workers in Uganda have one of the highest rates of HIV infections in the world. Some 99,878 female sex workers in 50 countries (14 in Asia, four in Eastern Europe, 11 in Latin America and the Caribbean, one in the Middle East and 20 in Africa), were subjects in the study conducted between January 1, 2007 and June 25, 2011. Results of the study, which was led by Dr. Stefan Baral of the US-based John Hopkins School of Public Health, were released on Thursday. The study, which assessed the burden of HIV compared to that of other women of reproductive age, found that the burden is disproportionately high and concluded that there is an urgent need to scale up access to quality HIV prevention programs for sex workers.State minister for ethics and integrity Fr. Simon Lokodo agrees that like all Ugandans, sex workers have a right to HIV treatment and attention.“However, giving them the leeway to operate as a business is too much to ask from the Government,” he said. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629853-37-ugandan-sex-workers-are-hiv-positive.html

320 women in Mbarara screened for cancer Newvision Tuesday March 20th 2012 by Mark Owor

A total of 320 women in Mbarara were on Saturday screened and tested for breast and cervical cancer at Mbarara referral hospital in western Uganda. It follows a partnership cancer awareness campaign between Centenary Bank and Rotary International last year to organize cancer vaccinations, testing, sensitization and referrals to access proper medical facilities.“Last year we launched a three-year anti-cancer initiative campaign in partnership with Rotary International to construct a two-storied cancer ward worth sh330m at St. Francis Hospital Nsambya,” the corporate affairs and communications manager, Allen Ayebare said.“The partnership includes holding of 12 community days spreading across the country during which cancer vaccinations, testing, sensitization and referrals to hospitals will be done as well as enhancing public awareness about early diagnosis and treatment options for cancer,” Ayebare stressed. She explained that only 45% of breast cancer patients and 18% of cervical cancer patients survive five years after diagnosis, which researchers attribute to late diagnosis due to ignorance and lack of technology. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629734-320-women-in-mbarara-screened-for-cancer.html

TB spreads 29% faster in jail The excess Tribune  Sunday March 25th 2012 by our correspondent

Tuberculosis (TB) spreads 29 per cent faster in jail than it does outside because the country’s prisons are overcrowded and inmates live in close proximity, said Punjab TB Control Programme Director Dr Drakashan Badar at an orientation session for journalists on World TB Day on Saturday.Dr Badar said the closer two people are, the faster the disease travels between them. The close physical proximity of prisoners in overcrowded jails was the reason for the higher rates of TB in prisons than outside, she said.Over 100,000 prisoners have been screened for TB under a Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS) linkage programme, she said. “Health is a human right and those who are in jail do not forfeit this right. If inmates are not treated in jail for TB, they can put the general population at risk of the disease when they come out of jail,” she said.

ARVs shortage soars as sh43.9b lies idle, New vision Sunday April 8th 2012 by Conan Businge

While people living with HIV/AIDS were grappling with shortage of anti-retroviral drugs last year, over sh43.9b meant for buying the drugs was lying idle in the government coffers, findings of an audit report have revealed. According to the latest Auditor General’s report released last week, the health ministry had received $24m (about 51.8b) from Global Fund to procure HIV/AIDS drugs. This, according to the report covering the period ending June 2011, was received in two disbursements of $4.2m (about sh8b) in November 2009 and $19.9m (about sh43b) in June 2010.Out of this amount, only sh7.9b (about 15.4%) was spent on procurement of ARVs and paying the program coordinator’s salary, leaving an unutilized balance of sh43.9b. The AG, Peter Nyombi says this reflects low absorption capacity of the project funds, which makes the attainment of the intended objectives within the stated time impossible. However, the report adds that non-utilization of the funds could be due to the delay in the release of the funds from the donors. The report calls for positive action as regards the findings. Read more athttp://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630169-arvs-shortage-soars-as-sh43-9b-lies-idle.html

Girl walks 12km for ARVs Newvision Tuesday April 10th 2012 by Tom Gwebayanga

For the last five months, 17-year-old Martha (not real name) has been a common sight on the Nabirumba-Kamuli road on her way to pick antiretro- viral (ARV) drugs from Kamuli Hospital. Her monthly trek began in December last year after her father, a resident of Nabwigulu sub-county, kicked her out of his home, saying he would not waste his resources on an HIV/ AIDS patient. Left with no choice, Martha left to live with grandfather, 9km farther away from the nearest health facility. This meant that despite her precarious health, she had to walk 12km to pick ARVs. Martha’s plight came to light last Friday at Nabirumba Health Centre III, where Plan, an NGO, organised a function to mark the World Tuberculosis Day. the Kamuli district information officer, Joseph Ngobi, said. Ngobi said Martha’s life was in danger because the grandfather, Nasani Musengawe, was too poor to provide a balanced diet or food supplements for the girl, let alone for him. “She is sickly because of poor feeding. A person on ARVs needs to eat foods that are rich in proteins and carbohydrates,” Ngobi added. “I have lost hope. Much as I get the drugs, I should have a balanced diet, which my grandfather cannot afford,” Martha said. She said she loves matooke, rice, meat, chicken and milk but nobody can offer her such food. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630207-girl-walks-12km-for-arvs.html

Womens height linked to ovarian cancer Newvision Monday April 9th 2012

Taller women have a slightly higher risk of ovarian cancer, according to a review of studies. Obesity is also a risk factor among women who have never taken HRT, say international researchers. Previous studies have suggested a link, but there has been conflicting evidence. The latest research, published in the journal PLoS Medicine, analysed all worldwide data on the topic. It looked at 47 epidemiological studies in 14 countries, including about 25,000 women with ovarian cancer and more than 80,000 women without ovarian cancer. Lead researcher Prof Valerie Beral of the Oxford University Epidemiology Unit told the BBC: "By bringing together the worldwide evidence, it became clear that height is a risk factor." She said there was also a clear relationship between obesity and ovarian cancer in women who had never taken HRT."Ovarian cancer can clearly be added to the list [of cancers linked to obesity]," she added. Sarah Williams, health information officer at Cancer Research UK, said the study produced a clearer picture of the factors that could affect a woman's risk of developing ovarian cancer, and found that body size was important. "Women can reduce their risk of this and many other diseases by keeping to a healthy weight," she said. "For women trying to lose weight, the best method is to eat healthily, eat smaller amounts and be more physically active." Commenting on the study, Dr Paul Pharoah, reader in cancer epidemiology at the University of Cambridge, said the increase in risk was small. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630206-women-s-height-linked-to-ovarian-cancer.html

Hungarian IPU institute donate to Cancer Foundation, New vision Wednesday April 04 2012, by Violet Nabatanzi Uganda Child Cancer Foundation has received 2,000 euros (about sh6.8m) from Hungarian delegation to the ongoing IPU assembly taking place in Kampala. The delegation led by Ambassador Sandor Juhasz handed over the funds to Dr. Jackson Orem; the executive director of Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI). Juhasz said that they want to make the life of suffering children get better. "Uganda is far from Hungary but such humane action will bring us very close to each other," Juhasz said. Orem assured the delegates that he will make sure that the donated fund goes directly to children affected with cancer. "As a foundation we have managed to achieve many instrumental achievements, as I speak now we have some children that managed to overcome the disease through the support of the clinical team from UCI, but we followed them back and we see them going back to school normally," Orem said.  The medical officer UCI, Nixon Niyonzima said the commonest type of cancer in children is Burkitt's lymphoma and on average the institute admits 15 children per month. "Some of the challenges we are faced with is that the fact that the patients come when it is too late, sometimes they go to traditional healers first and wait until the condition gets worse," Niyonzima said.  Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630094-hungarian-ipu-delegates-donate-to-cancer-foundation.html

Sh43.9b lies idle as ARV shortage bites Newvision Monday April 9th 2012 by Canon Businge

While people living with HIV were grappling with shortage of anti-retroviral drugs last year, over sh43.9b meant for buying the drugs was lying idle in the government coffers. According to the latest Auditor General’s report released last week, the health ministry had received $24m (about 51.8b) from Global Fund to procure HIV/AIDS medicines. This, according to the report covering the period ending June 2011, was received in two disbursements of $4.2m (about sh8b) in November 2009 and $19.9m (about sh43b) in June 2010. Out of this amount, only sh7.9b (about 15.4%) was spent on procurement of ARVs and paying the Program Coordinator’s salary leaving unutilised balance of sh43.9b. This, the AG says, reflects low absorption capacity of the project funds, which makes the attainment of the intended objectives within the stated time impossible. However, the report adds that non-utilisation of the funds could be due to the delay in the release of the funds from the donors. The report recommends that the management of the health ministry “should follow up the matter to ensure that there is timely release of the project funds to enable implementation of all agreed activities.” In response to the audit report, the Ministry of Health explained that they had addressed the problem by appointing the National Medical Stores as the procurement agent for pharmaceuticals and health supplies for the public sector. This move was designed to improve funds absorption since most of the money is meant for buying pharmaceuticals and health supplies. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630187-sh43-9b-lies-idle-as-arv-shortage-bites.html

Tuberculosis on the rise in prisons New vision Thursday April 5th 2012 by Petride Mudoola

The medical superintendent at Murchison Bay Hospital Luzira Prisons has advised Government to invest in the management of tuberculosis (TB) in prisons so as to eradicate the disease. Dr Joseph Andama Oluka says TB prevalence in detention facilities is two to five times much higher than the one in the national average, which requires immediate intervention. "Despite the high TB prevalence rate in prisons, interventions to reduce the disease are still minimal.” According to the Prisons medical service, TB prevalence in prisons stands at 10% compared to the 6.4% national prevalence rate. Currently more than 70 prisoners are on TB treatment. Oluka cites congestion in the detention facilities as part of the problem. “The determinacy of infectious diseases like tuberculosis is very prevalent in prisons due to congestion and given the fact that majority of the prisoners are poor and come from disease trodden areas.” Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem in Uganda with an annual incidence of 330 cases of all forms and 136 new smear positive cases per 100,000 people per year according to reports from World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO Global Report released in 2010 ranked Uganda 16th among the 22 TB high burden countries and the expected case load per year is 102,000 people. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630110-tuberculosis-on-the-rise-in-prisons.html

Govt to provide free food to nodding children, says Mbabazi Newvision  Thursday April 5th 2012 by Francis Kagolo

The Government is to supply free food to children in northern Uganda particularly areas worst hit by nodding disease as one of the measures to curb the epidemic Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi has announced. He also declared mass treatment of river blindness in the entire region as the country awaits health experts to discover the cause and best treatment for nodding disease. The area is river blindness endemic. “We are going to supply  food because one of the problems in the area is  lack of  food and  basic vitamins among children. We have so far set up three treatment centres. We want to increase them to at least 10 so that all children can be observed, given food and drugs.”” Mbabazi said. “He revealed this on Wednesday during a meeting with a group of visiting US senators and representatives who came to Uganda courtesy of CARE, a global charity organization working in northern Uganda. The meeting took place at this office in Kampala. The delegation, led by Helene Gayle, the chief executive of CARE USA, and Johnny Isakson, senator of Georgia, wanted to know efforts the Government was undertaking to develop the war-torn northern Uganda. Mbabazi said, save for nodding disease which was posing new challenges, the region was on the right track to total recovery and development, thanks to the Peace Recovery and Development Programme (PRDP). Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630127-govt-to-provide-free-food-to-nodding-children-says-mbabazi.html

Tachoma hits 6,000 in Moroto Newvision Wednesday April 04th 2012 by O.Wanyama

Over 6,000 people have been treated for eye complications at Moroto Hospital over the last three months. The officer in charge of the hospital’s eye clinic, Sister Emily Akullu, said most of the patient’s rare suffering from trachoma that has hit the districts of Napak and Moroto. Trachoma is caused by bacteria known as chlamydia trachomatis. The disease presents with swollen itchy eyes and a yellow discharge from the eyes. The signs of trachoma are usually noticed five to 12 days after exposure to the bacteria.It spreads through poor hygiene and sharing face towels. Akullu told New Vision on Saturday that between 30 to 50 patients are diagnosed with trachoma every day. She said many people suffer from cataracts and other defects that can be managed if treatment starts early. Akullu cautioned residents on the dangers of delayed treatment of trachoma, saying it could cause blindness. She said trachoma can be prevented by improving sanitation, especially among children who are at high at risk of contracting the disease. Akullu said the district health department is using village health teams to sensitise the communities on sanitation and the importance of seeking treatment early. The World Health Organisation says about six million people worldwide are blind due to trachoma and more than 150 million others are in dire need of treatment. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630091-tachoma-hits-6-000-in-moroto.html

Moyo health workers take on tropical diseases New vision Tuesday April 03rd2012  by  Andrew Amvesi The health officials and community leaders in Moyo district have laid strategies to carry out massive campaigns on neglected tropical disease which have affected the local communities in the rural areas.  The move is aimed at fighting neglected tropical diseases such as sleeping sickness, trachoma, elephantiasis and Bilharzias that have affected most communities especially along river banks and near forested areas.  During a sensitization and advocacy meeting that was held at Moyo district headquarters on Friday, the Vector control officer, Nicholas Onwong, said most people in rural areas are at a higher risk of contracting the diseases due to the nature of their settlement. “Majority of us opted to settle along river banks and in forested areas for reasons of easy cultivation without knowing that parasites which transmit tropical neglected diseases also live with us,” Onwong asserted. He urged such community members to visit health units and community based medicine distributors for drugs in an effort to fight tropical neglected diseases in the district.  Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630077-moyo-health-workers-take-on-tropical-diseases.html

American charity equips Manafwa with medical aid Newvision Tuesday April 2nd 2012 by Joseph Wanzusi

Healthcare services in Manafwa district are expected to improve after the district received an assortment of medical supplies worth US $500,000 (about sh1.26b) from Kissito Healthcare International (KHI) an American charity organisation. Handing over the equipment that included a state-of-the-art neonatal incubator, the Kissito USA project manager Clarissa Clarke said the donation is to enhance health care services at Bugobero Health Centre IV and cut down on referral cases from the district. Clarke said her organisation was committed to working in partnership with Manafwa district authorities in up-grading Bugobero health centre to a district hospital.“The equipment donation is part of a comprehensive health sector development plan that covers mother, infant and young child nutrition and malnutrition management, health sector human resource development and maternal health under a public-private partnership,” Clarke said. Clarke said KHI joined hands with Manafwa district in March 2011 to provide supply chain management assistance through donation of drugs and supplies and identified nurses and clinical officers, who were passionate about patient care and provided them with a monetary incentive for their hard work and commitment to patient care at Bugobero health centre. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630042-american-charity-equips-manafwa-with-medical-aid.html

ARVs shortage soars as sh43.9b lies idle, New vision Sunday April 8th 2012 by Conan Businge

While people living with HIV/AIDS were grappling with shortage of anti-retroviral drugs last year, over sh43.9b meant for buying the drugs was lying idle in the government coffers, findings of an audit report have revealed. According to the latest Auditor General’s report released last week, the health ministry had received $24m (about 51.8b) from Global Fund to procure HIV/AIDS drugs. This, according to the report covering the period ending June 2011, was received in two disbursements of $4.2m (about sh8b) in November 2009 and $19.9m (about sh43b) in June 2010.Out of this amount, only sh7.9b (about 15.4%) was spent on procurement of ARVs and paying the program coordinator’s salary, leaving an unutilized balance of sh43.9b. The AG, Peter Nyombi says this reflects low absorption capacity of the project funds, which makes the attainment of the intended objectives within the stated time impossible. However, the report adds that non-utilization of the funds could be due to the delay in the release of the funds from the donors. The report calls for positive action as regards the findings. Read more athttp://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630169-arvs-shortage-soars-as-sh43-9b-lies-idle.html

Girl walks 12km for ARVs Newvision Tuesday April 10th 2012 by Tom Gwebayanga

For the last five months, 17-year-old Martha (not real name) has been a common sight on the Nabirumba-Kamuli road on her way to pick antiretro- viral (ARV) drugs from Kamuli Hospital. Her monthly trek began in December last year after her father, a resident of Nabwigulu sub-county, kicked her out of his home, saying he would not waste his resources on an HIV/ AIDS patient. Left with no choice, Martha left to live with grandfather, 9km farther away from the nearest health facility. This meant that despite her precarious health, she had to walk 12km to pick ARVs. Martha’s plight came to light last Friday at Nabirumba Health Centre III, where Plan, an NGO, organised a function to mark the World Tuberculosis Day. the Kamuli district information officer, Joseph Ngobi, said. Ngobi said Martha’s life was in danger because the grandfather, Nasani Musengawe, was too poor to provide a balanced diet or food supplements for the girl, let alone for him. “She is sickly because of poor feeding. A person on ARVs needs to eat foods that are rich in proteins and carbohydrates,” Ngobi added. “I have lost hope. Much as I get the drugs, I should have a balanced diet, which my grandfather cannot afford,” Martha said. She said she loves matooke, rice, meat, chicken and milk but nobody can offer her such food. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630207-girl-walks-12km-for-arvs.html

Womens height linked to ovarian cancer Newvision Monday April 9th 2012

Taller women have a slightly higher risk of ovarian cancer, according to a review of studies. Obesity is also a risk factor among women who have never taken HRT, say international researchers. Previous studies have suggested a link, but there has been conflicting evidence. The latest research, published in the journal PLoS Medicine, analysed all worldwide data on the topic. It looked at 47 epidemiological studies in 14 countries, including about 25,000 women with ovarian cancer and more than 80,000 women without ovarian cancer. Lead researcher Prof Valerie Beral of the Oxford University Epidemiology Unit told the BBC: "By bringing together the worldwide evidence, it became clear that height is a risk factor." She said there was also a clear relationship between obesity and ovarian cancer in women who had never taken HRT."Ovarian cancer can clearly be added to the list [of cancers linked to obesity]," she added. Sarah Williams, health information officer at Cancer Research UK, said the study produced a clearer picture of the factors that could affect a woman's risk of developing ovarian cancer, and found that body size was important. "Women can reduce their risk of this and many other diseases by keeping to a healthy weight," she said. "For women trying to lose weight, the best method is to eat healthily, eat smaller amounts and be more physically active." Commenting on the study, Dr Paul Pharoah, reader in cancer epidemiology at the University of Cambridge, said the increase in risk was small. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630206-women-s-height-linked-to-ovarian-cancer.html

Hungarian IPU institute donate to Cancer Foundation, Newvision Wednesday April 04 2012, by Violet Nabatanzi

Uganda Child Cancer Foundation has received 2,000 euros (about sh6.8m) from Hungarian delegation to the ongoing IPU assembly taking place in Kampala. The delegation led by Ambassador Sandor Juhasz handed over the funds to Dr. Jackson Orem; the executive director of Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI). Juhasz said that they want to make the life of suffering children get better. "Uganda is far from Hungary but such humane action will bring us very close to each other," Juhasz said. Orem assured the delegates that he will make sure that the donated fund goes directly to children affected with cancer. "As a foundation we have managed to achieve many instrumental achievements, as I speak now we have some children that managed to overcome the disease through the support of the clinical team from UCI, but we followed them back and we see them going back to school normally," Orem said.  The medical officer UCI, Nixon Niyonzima said the commonest type of cancer in children is Burkitt's lymphoma and on average the institute admits 15 children per month. "Some of the challenges we are faced with is that the fact that the patients come when it is too late, sometimes they go to traditional healers first and wait until the condition gets worse," Niyonzima said.  Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630094-hungarian-ipu-delegates-donate-to-cancer-foundation.html

Sh43.9b lies idle as ARV shortage bites Newvision Monday April 9th 2012 by Canon Businge

While people living with HIV were grappling with shortage of anti-retroviral drugs last year, over sh43.9b meant for buying the drugs was lying idle in the government coffers. According to the latest Auditor General’s report released last week, the health ministry had received $24m (about 51.8b) from Global Fund to procure HIV/AIDS medicines. This, according to the report covering the period ending June 2011, was received in two disbursements of $4.2m (about sh8b) in November 2009 and $19.9m (about sh43b) in June 2010. Out of this amount, only sh7.9b (about 15.4%) was spent on procurement of ARVs and paying the Program Coordinator’s salary leaving unutilised balance of sh43.9b. This, the AG says, reflects low absorption capacity of the project funds, which makes the attainment of the intended objectives within the stated time impossible. However, the report adds that non-utilisation of the funds could be due to the delay in the release of the funds from the donors. The report recommends that the management of the health ministry “should follow up the matter to ensure that there is timely release of the project funds to enable implementation of all agreed activities.” In response to the audit report, the Ministry of Health explained that they had addressed the problem by appointing the National Medical Stores as the procurement agent for pharmaceuticals and health supplies for the public sector. This move was designed to improve funds absorption since most of the money is meant for buying pharmaceuticals and health supplies. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630187-sh43-9b-lies-idle-as-arv-shortage-bites.html

 

Tuberculosis on the rise in prisons New vision Thursday April 5th 2012 by Petride Mudoola

The medical superintendent at Murchison Bay Hospital Luzira Prisons has advised Government to invest in the management of tuberculosis (TB) in prisons so as to eradicate the disease. Dr Joseph Andama Oluka says TB prevalence in detention facilities is two to five times much higher than the one in the national average, which requires immediate intervention. "Despite the high TB prevalence rate in prisons, interventions to reduce the disease are still minimal.” According to the Prisons medical service, TB prevalence in prisons stands at 10% compared to the 6.4% national prevalence rate. Currently more than 70 prisoners are on TB treatment. Oluka cites congestion in the detention facilities as part of the problem. “The determinacy of infectious diseases like tuberculosis is very prevalent in prisons due to congestion and given the fact that majority of the prisoners are poor and come from disease trodden areas.” Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem in Uganda with an annual incidence of 330 cases of all forms and 136 new smear positive cases per 100,000 people per year according to reports from World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO Global Report released in 2010 ranked Uganda 16th among the 22 TB high burden countries and the expected case load per year is 102,000 people. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630110-tuberculosis-on-the-rise-in-prisons.html

Govt to provide free food to nodding children, says Mbabazi Newvision  Thursday April 5th 2012 by Francis Kagolo

The Government is to supply free food to children in northern Uganda particularly areas worst hit by nodding disease as one of the measures to curb the epidemic Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi has announced. He also declared mass treatment of river blindness in the entire region as the country awaits health experts to discover the cause and best treatment for nodding disease. The area is river blindness endemic. “We are going to supply  food because one of the problems in the area is  lack of  food and  basic vitamins among children. We have so far set up three treatment centres. We want to increase them to at least 10 so that all children can be observed, given food and drugs.”” Mbabazi said. “He revealed this on Wednesday during a meeting with a group of visiting US senators and representatives who came to Uganda courtesy of CARE, a global charity organization working in northern Uganda. The meeting took place at this office in Kampala. The delegation, led by Helene Gayle, the chief executive of CARE USA, and Johnny Isakson, senator of Georgia, wanted to know efforts the Government was undertaking to develop the war-torn northern Uganda. Mbabazi said, save for nodding disease which was posing new challenges, the region was on the right track to total recovery and development, thanks to the Peace Recovery and Development Programme (PRDP). Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630127-govt-to-provide-free-food-to-nodding-children-says-mbabazi.html

Tachoma hits 6,000 in Moroto Newvision Wednesday April 04th 2012 by O.Wanyama

Over 6,000 people have been treated for eye complications at Moroto Hospital over the last three months. The officer in charge of the hospital’s eye clinic, Sister Emily Akullu, said most of the patient’s rare suffering from trachoma that has hit the districts of Napak and Moroto. Trachoma is caused by bacteria known as chlamydia trachomatis. The disease presents with swollen itchy eyes and a yellow discharge from the eyes. The signs of trachoma are usually noticed five to 12 days after exposure to the bacteria.It spreads through poor hygiene and sharing face towels. Akullu told New Vision on Saturday that between 30 to 50 patients are diagnosed with trachoma every day. She said many people suffer from cataracts and other defects that can be managed if treatment starts early. Akullu cautioned residents on the dangers of delayed treatment of trachoma, saying it could cause blindness. She said trachoma can be prevented by improving sanitation, especially among children who are at high at risk of contracting the disease. Akullu said the district health department is using village health teams to sensitise the communities on sanitation and the importance of seeking treatment early. The World Health Organisation says about six million people worldwide are blind due to trachoma and more than 150 million others are in dire need of treatment. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630091-tachoma-hits-6-000-in-moroto.html

Moyo health workers take on tropical diseases Newvision Tuesday April 03rd 2012 by  Andrew Amvesi The health officials and community leaders in Moyo district have laid strategies to carry out massive campaigns on neglected tropical disease which have affected the local communities in the rural areas.  The move is aimed at fighting neglected tropical diseases such as sleeping sickness, trachoma, elephantiasis and Bilharzias that have affected most communities especially along river banks and near forested areas.  During a sensitization and advocacy meeting that was held at Moyo district headquarters on Friday, the Vector control officer, Nicholas Onwong, said most people in rural areas are at a higher risk of contracting the diseases due to the nature of their settlement. “Majority of us opted to settle along river banks and in forested areas for reasons of easy cultivation without knowing that parasites which transmit tropical neglected diseases also live with us,” Onwong asserted. He urged such community members to visit health units and community based medicine distributors for drugs in an effort to fight tropical neglected diseases in the district.  Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630077-moyo-health-workers-take-on-tropical-diseases.html

American charity equips Manafwa with medical aid Newvision Tuesday April 2nd 2012 by Joseph Wanzusi

Healthcare services in Manafwa district are expected to improve after the district received an assortment of medical supplies worth US $500,000 (about sh1.26b) from Kissito Healthcare International (KHI) an American charity organisation. Handing over the equipment that included a state-of-the-art neonatal incubator, the Kissito USA project manager Clarissa Clarke said the donation is to enhance health care services at Bugobero Health Centre IV and cut down on referral cases from the district. Clarke said her organisation was committed to working in partnership with Manafwa district authorities in up-grading Bugobero health centre to a district hospital.“The equipment donation is part of a comprehensive health sector development plan that covers mother, infant and young child nutrition and malnutrition management, health sector human resource development and maternal health under a public-private partnership,” Clarke said. Clarke said KHI joined hands with Manafwa district in March 2011 to provide supply chain management assistance through donation of drugs and supplies and identified nurses and clinical officers, who were passionate about patient care and provided them with a monetary incentive for their hard work and commitment to patient care at Bugobero health centre. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630042-american-charity-equips-manafwa-with-medical-aid.html

Uganda to Make new Aids Drugs New vision Wednesday 08 February 2012 By Taddeo Bwambale and Vivian Agaba.

Quality chemicals a Ugandan pharmaceutical company will next month start producing a new ARV drug (Tenofovir), a monthly dose of this will cost $ 20 as compared to $ 600 for the same drug in Europe. While most advanced countries have switched to Tenofovir, many poor countries have not because it is expensive yet it is a first line treatment for HIV. According to the medical stores general manager Moses Kamabare, the purchase of anti-malarial and ARVs locally has significantly reduced on cases of stock outs and the cost of buying the ARVs from the plant has slightly reduced from $ 2.4 per dose when production began to $ 1.9.

Government offers condolences over nodding disease Daily Monitor, Wednesday February 8, 2012 By Sheila Naturinda

The deputy, leader of government business, Gen. Moses Ali acknowledge that the situation of the nodding disease is mysterious, but said he had asked the Minister of health, Dr. Christine Ondoa to explain and answer all demands made by the political leaders of the Acholi sub region districts where children are affected. The Acholi MPs therefore tabled a bill in parliament demanding that Acholi region be declared a disaster area having; a comprehensive report, creating mobile clinics, a full budget be channeled to the area and intensified research to discover the name and cause of the disease.

Plague outbreak suspected as two die in Arua Daily Monitor, Wednesday February 8 2012 By Felix Warom Okello and Clement Aluma

A fresh outbreak of plague is suspected in Arua after two people died of similar symptoms in Vurra County and the district health officials have put the community on alert, although the DHO of Arua said he is still consulting the details of the disease. The plague outbreaks were from the neighboring DR Congo over the years.

Women circumcised by force, Daily Monitor, Monday, February 13th 2012 by Joseph Aliti

Women who refuse to undergo female genital mutilation in pokot and Tepit communities in Karimoja sub-region are forcibly cut by traditional birth attendants during delivering. This is criminal and I strongly warn who ever has been doing it to stop because they risk ending in prison, State minister for gender Rukiya Nakadama reveals. This practice infringes on women’s rights and causes physical harm thus a threat to their reproductive health. With funds from UNICEF, UNFPA and France government a zero tolerance program was launched in the region last year.

80 nursing students stranded as education minister closes school, Daily Monitor, Monday, February 13th 2012

At least 80 students of Nwoya teaching hospital medical school are stranded after the institute closed following directive from minister of education for allegedly operating illegally. The institute opened last year and its director Dr. Claive Onen collected shs 700,000-800,000 and the students complained that they have not been taught and having a deteriorating standards of living at the school. This was there after followed by the doctor’s arrest.

Uganda facing condom shortage, Daily Monitor, Tuesday, February 14, 2012 by Brian Ssenoga Kimuli.

Uganda needs about 3 billion condoms a year to cater for about 10 million people who are in the active age bracket, health official notes. The country has been importing about 120 million condoms annually in the last five years, but this figure is way beyond the current demand. Dr.Mina Ssali, the Public Relations Officer Uganda Cares says National Condom day comes on February 14th Valentine’s Day which is an ideal day to encourage condom use when love and lust are high.

Israel to support health services in Uganda, New vision, Monday, February 13th 2012 by vision reporter

The new Israel ambassador to Uganda has disclosed that his ministry will support Uganda’s health ministry in establishing vibrant ambulance service in the country. Ambassador Gil Heskel said this during his visit to Uganda emphasizing that Israel is willing to strengthen co-operation with Uganda in many areas, health being one of them.

Maternal Child care project launched, Daily Monitor, Tuesday, February 14, 2012 by Paul Bishanga

A five year maternal and childcare health project has been launched in Kabale district. Dr. Geoffrey Anguyo, a senior health official said 200-bed hospital will be constructed and six ambulances will be purchased to enable the transportation of mothers from the rural areas. Dr. Francis Mwesigye Runumi therefore cautions health workers against laxity in their work.

More ARV centre’s needed, Daily Monitor, Tuesday February 14, 2012, by Joseph Mugisha

The limited number of health centre’s that offer ARV services in the Rwenzori region is hindering  the efforts to cater for people living with HIV Aids. The 41 facilities in the region are not enough and the facilities are poor due to poor facilities and poor staff remunerations the Kyegegwa District Chairman Norman Birungi says.

Embrace new health system, New vision, Monday, February 13th 2012 by Rukia Nakamatte.

The ministry of health working closely with the United States Agency International Development (USAID) and IntraHealth, have developed the human resources for health a tool that can avail you with reliable information on health workers which will provide accurate data and sufficient system for the flow of information. More than 60% of the health workers are in urban areas serving less than 20% of the population yet 80% of these live in rural areas. The new system will therefore provide data on available health workers, their distribution and their productivity. This system will also provide reliable and complete evidence for health work force planning, recruitment, deployment and payroll management.

Health Ministry to demolish 100 theatres, Daily Monitor, Wednesday, February 15th 2012 by Agatha Ayebazibwe

More than 100 theatres at the lower health units built at Shs 100 million each will face demolition while others are to be rehabilitated. These facilities were built to boost healthcare at health centre IVs and their demolition could mean a loss of at least shs10b spent on construction, minus the cost of demolition. The theaters are in Kihihi, Kabale, Sironko, Mubende, Mbarara, Kiruhura, Lira Masaka and Hoima, although these structures remained unused because they did not meet basic standards both in design and structure.

Mulago cancer Institute gets shs 27m,  New vision, Wednesday, February 15th 2012 by Violet Natabanzi and Vivian Agaba

The Uganda Cancer Institute in Mulago Hospita receives over 27M shs for prostate cancer research. The director of Uganda Cancer Institute Jackson Orem said no research had been done on prostate cancer in Uganda since 1965 and many men with such cases report late for diagnosis which makes it that out of the 100 diagnosed with cancer, 80 die after a year.

Mulago rehabilitation plan released, New vision, Thursday, February 16th February 2012 by John Odyek and Joyce Namutebi

Parliament has approved a $73M (shs168b) from African Development bank and $15M (shs 35b) from the Nigeria Trust Fund to improve health services at Mulago referral hospital and two city hospitals. Dr. Richard Ndahuura minister for health said this project would be implemented over 54-month period and it is designed to redirect the high demand for basic healthcare that currently congests at Mulago. This will also support establishment of two new secondary health facilities at Makindye and Kawempe.

US govt boosts health drive for UPDF, New vision, Thursday, February 16th   2012 by Raymond Baguma

The US embassy in Kampala has donated three mobile surgical unit, three vans, four trucks with tents and surgical gear worth sh1.8b to be used in safe Medical circumcision by the Uganda Peoples Defence Forces. Observing that SMC does not provide 100% protection against HIV/AIDS, the US ambassador Jerry Lanier urged surgical teams to always tell their clients of other ways to minimize the risk of contracting the virus. These teams will also help the UPDF meet its bold goal of circumcising 60,000 men over the next three years.   

14-year-old Arua mum fighting for life, New vision, Thursday, February 16th 2012 by Richard Drasimaku

A 14-year old mother who underwent a caesarean section at Nebbi Hospital last month is stranded at Arua Hospital in critical condition. According to a medical report, part of the girl’s abdomen was left with a gaping wound and Arua Hospital doctors said some of her internal organs were cut during the caesarean section.

Kasese district records 30 new cholera cases , New vision, Thursday, February 2012 by Benard Masereka.

A cholera outbreak in Bukonzo west constituency in Kasese district has hit another low point since it was first reported in October. Last Thursday, 30 cases were reported to the Cholera treatment centres and a meeting by the district leaders resolved that the sale of all food stuffs be banned immediately and heads of households without latrines be arrested and public latrines be dug to curb this. It was also observed that inadequate water supply in the affected area had made it hard for the residents to maintain a good sanitation in the area.

Kalungu gets Shs 4b Aids hospital, Daily Monitor, Thursday, February 16 2012 by Brian Ssenoga Kimuli

A state-of-the art hospital for specialized treatment of people living with HIV/Aids in Lukaya Town, Kalunga district to eradicate HIV/Aids scourge in Uganda got a boost yesterday after Uganda Cares NGO announced its construction. The facility is expected to offer free treatment to about 30,000 HIV/Aids patients a year. A survey done last year by ministry of health in the district found the prevalence rate here to be very high at 12%, while testing and counseling services are relatively low and only 38% of the people know their status. This is therefore a move to increase access to HIV/Aids services.

Nodding disease cause unknown-expert New vision Friday February 17, 2012 by Anne Mugisha

A US-based health expert has arrived in Uganda to help find more clues on the cause of the nodding disease epidemic in Northern Uganda. Dr. Scott Dowell told journalists that numerous tests done at the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) Atlanta in US have not revealed much about the disease. However, two strong leads being followed have connection to river blindness (Onchocerciasis), low serum concentration and low Vitamin B6 was detected too. Serum is the blood component which does not contain the white blood cells or the clotting factor. The affected people 95% of whom are children 5-15 years will be treated with epileptic drugs.

Project to reduce maternal, child mortality starts in Kibaale, New vision, Friday, February 17 2012 Ismael Kasooha

The infectious disease has launched a one year project code named “Saving Mothers Giving Life” at reducing the death of mothers and new-born babies in Kibaale district with support from the US. Edward Kyagulany the project coordinator said the project will ensure that all expectant mothers get obstetric care while giving birth in all health facilities in Kibaale. This intervention followed data indicating 450 mothers out of every 100,000 die annually due to complications in delivering. The mothers will be supported with incentives like transport to and fro the health centre’s, nutrition foods, baby kits and treated mosquito nets.

CSM Vaccinations in upper East region GBC News 24th Friday February 2012

Following reports of an outbreak of Cerebro-Spinal Meningitis, CSM, in the Upper East Region which claimed 16 lives, the Director of Health Services, Dr. Awoonor Williams says vaccination exercises are ongoing by health workers to help eradicate the disease. Speaking on GBC's Current Affairs Programme 'Behind the News', Dr. Williams said people with the disease should report early to health centres for treatment.  He said most people with the disease resort to other places for a cure instead of health centers. Read more at: http://www.gbcghana.com/index.php?id=1.795674

Poorly processed peanut butter causes cancer, New Vision, Thursday February23rd2012 by Prossy Nandudu

Consumption of poorly processed peanut butter can cause Cancer of the Liver, according to a research done by Makerere University in partnership with the University of Georgia. Dr. A. Achilleo Kaaya, the lead researcher from the faculty of Food Science and Technology, said most of the groundnuts are contaminated during the harvest and storage process. The problem has been compounded further by the processors who mix the quality groundnuts with the dirty and rotten ones while grinding. 'Directly looking at peanut butter, it is not easy to see the aflotoxins. Unfortunately, any of the methods we use for preparing the nuts, cooking, roasting, cannot remove the toxins because they are chemicals. Their melting point is 300 degrees Celsius,' Kaaya added. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629214-poorly-processed-peanut-butter-causes-cancer.html

Nodding disease centre set in Pader, New Vision,Wednesday, February 22 2012 by Petride Mudoola.

Government should establish a vector control centre in Pader district in order to get rid of the nodding disease within the area, the LC5 Pader District Alfred Akena has advised. Over 200 children have so far died of the mysterious disease in northern Uganda. Ministry of Health reported early this month that it had recorded 66 deaths as a result of the disease. The number has since more than tripled. Recent studies done by the health ministry and the Centre for Disease Control did not indicate any conclusive causes of the nodding disease but established that the number of children infected with the disease had  risen to over 3,000 from 2,000 reported at the beginning of this year. “Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629174-nodding-disease-vector-control-centre-vital-in-pader.html

Food joints shut after poisoning, Daily Monitor, Wednesday, February 22, 2012 by Simon Peter Emwamu

Food joint owners in Bugondo Sub-county in Serere District are pondering their next move after residents and LC3 chairpersons demolished their business premises over alleged poisoning. The demolition done on Monday comes a day after the residents and the sub-county council resolved that the food spots were being hired by unscrupulous individuals to poison people. “We have discovered that these people are being used, and to safeguard our lives it was inevitable to stop them from doing business,” Mr Okurut said. Mr Apollo Ewidu, the area LC3 chairman, said the vice is on the rise following endless land wrangles in the area. “We shall not allow these people to operate, unless they reveal to us who are the master minders of this act,” he added. Read more at: http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/-/688334/1332382/-/b08n02z/-/index.html

Nodding disease confounds experts- kill’s children, Agency France Press, Wednesday, February 22 2012

Anywar is one of more than 3,000 children in northern Uganda who are suffering from a debilitating mystery ailment known as nodding disease, which has touched almost every family in the village of Tumangu. For several years, scientists have tried and failed to determine the cause of the illness, which locals say has killed hundreds of youngsters. The disease affects only children and gradually devastates its victims through debilitating seizures, stunted growth, wasted limbs, mental disabilities and sometimes starvation. Scientists are trying to find a cure: since 2010, researchers ranging from epidemiologists to environmental experts, neurologists, toxicologists and psychiatrists have carried out a range of tests. Read more at: http://www.ndtv.com/article/world/nodding-disease-confounds-experts-kills-children-178523&cp

1200 Namugongo residents get free treatment New Vision Tuesday February 21, 2012 by Elvis Kyotalengerire

. Dr. Nicholas Wooding, the acting vice-chancellor of IHSU, said they offered free health care services and treatment to the low-income residents of Namuwongo as part of their corporate social responsibility. “We realized the people in Namugongo community suffer many common illnesses because they cannot afford and access treatment. Besides, majority lack knowledge on proper hygiene,” Wooding said. “We could not work in isolation. We provided the manpower and a number of organisations, including International Medical Group, National Drug Authority, Joint Medical Stores, Kampala Pharmaceuticals Limited and Quality Chemicals sponsored. Read more at http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629115-1-200-namuwongo-residents-get-free-treatment.html

Mpigi residents wants more HIV/AIDS Education New Vision Tuesday February 21, 2012 by Elvis Basudde

Residents of Buyiga Island, Kammengo sub-county in Mpigi district have asked government to intensify HIV/AIDS an awareness campaign in the area.It is presumed many people living on the island hold strong convictions on HIV/AIDS."We still carry myths and misconceptions about HIV/AIDS. People are hesitant to have HIV tests because they are not sensitized," said Betty Nabwanika of Buyiga A. Participants revealed that during HIV testing in community outreaches, clients are not given enough counselling. And as a result, people who test HIV positive find their health deteriorating immediately. They noted that it discourages other community members from testing for the virus Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629159-mpigi-residents-want-more-hiv-aids-education.html

Infertility- an advantage against prostate cancer, Daily Rx, Tuesday, February 21 2012By Travis Gidding

Children are the future, as they say. But new research into prostate cancer shows, maybe your children says something about your future too. A doctor in Sweden has recently published his thesis, showing that infertile - or what he calls "sub fertile" - men may have half the risk of prostate cancer of men who have at least one child. In a study examining the connection between fertility and prostate cancer risk, Yasir Ruhayel, M.D., from Lund University and Skane University Hospital compared 450 men with prostate cancer against a control group of 450 men without prostate cancer. The link between sub fertility and reduced prostate cancer risk was stronger than other common risk factors including diet, smoking, alcohol use or disease, according to this study. Read more at: http://www.dailyrx.com/news-article/prostate-cancer-risk-and-male-infertility-linked-17696.html

Patients to continue nodding as funds delay, Daily Monitor, Tuesday, February 21, 2012  by Harriet Anena

Thousands of children suffering from nodding disease in northern Uganda will continue to wait for a comprehensive intervention with the ministry of health still unsure of when the Shs 7 billion requested for from Finance will be released. The available Shs 100 million mobilised through reallocations from Health Ministry is the only funding being used in the affected districts of Kitgum, Lamwo, and Pader, where the nodding disease has affected 3,000 children and killed 200.The delay in training health workers to handle the nodding symptoms and unavailable money could only mean more suffering for the children and parents most of whom are suffering to keep their children alive.

Koboko couple loses baby, files complaint against health centre. Daily Monitor, Tuesday, February 21 2012 by Peter Aliga & Felix Warom Okello.

Yossa Mambo has lodged a complaint against a health centre in Yumbe District with the Uganda Human Rights Commission in Arua following the death of his baby during a caesarian operation of his wife. Mambo said his baby’s life could have been saved, but when his wife and him reached Lodonga hospital, the nurse only examined his wife after he realized her condition had worsened and rushed her to Yumbe hospital. The baby’s head was cut during the operation and the body removed, medical reports show that the woman had a ruptured uterus.

Patience cry foul as X-ray machine idle Daily Monitor Tuesday February 21 2012 by Denis Ongeng.

Patients in Apac are paying at least Shs20, 000 for x-ray services in private clinic because the Shs 400m hospital X-ray machine has not been working for months. The patients said that it has become expensive for them to access the services in a private facility. The hospital health officer said the machine lacks chemicals to produce pictures on the X-ray films. One patient who broke his leg in an accident last year said he spent 50,000 on X-ray machines.

Obama’s health visits, New Vision, Monday February, 20th 2012 by John Odyek

The Executive Director of US President Barack Obama's Global Health Initiative (GHI) Lois Quam arrives in Uganda today (Monday) for a one week visit to support the Ministry of Health's effort to reduce maternal deaths by 50 percent in four western districts by the end of 2012.According to ministry of health and other health experts, the common causes of death among pregnant mothers are over bleeding, infection, obstructed labour, abortion, pregnancy related hypertension and compounding factors that include malaria and HIV/Aids disease. Only one in four girls have access to contraceptives, and 50 percent of all pregnancies are unintended, resulting in the deaths of around 16 Ugandan mothers each day. Uganda has a shortfall of 2000 midwives who are critical to reduce maternal mortality as pregnant mothers must deliver with a skilled attendant according to the Uganda Nations Fund (UNFPA) for Population Activities. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629135-obama-s-health-official-visits.html

Arthritis: How to tell your child is affected, New Vision , Tuesday, Monday February 20 2012 by Viqué-Ocean Kahinju

According to health experts, this could be juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, a form of arthritis that may result in joint pain and swelling. They add that arthritis is common among the elderly, but children too can suffer from it although it is rare. Dr. Phillip Besimire, a paediatrician at St. Xavier Child Care Centre, says juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is prevalent in children aged less than 16 years. Symptoms Similar to other forms of arthritis, the symptoms often flash up and disappear, but sometimes can be persistent. A child may have difficulty walking or stretching the limbs. The cause is not specific, but Besimire says the condition occurs when the body’s immune system attacks the cells and tissues, leading to inflammation of the muscles and joints. It is mainly triggered by infections caused by a virus or bacteria. Untreated rheumatoid arthritis causes persistent joint pain, muscle swelling and stiffness, which affects growth body movements, usually resulting in disfigurement or deformities. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629125-arthritis-how-to-tell-your-child-is-affected.html

Bugiri Hospital suffers brain drain, New vision, Friday February 24th 2012, by Frederick Womakuyu

From the Bugiri-Malaba highway, Bugiri hospital appears to be a deserted facility. The tin roofs hovering over the facility are rusted, its doors broken down and the infrastructure is dilapidated. But coming closer to the facility, you see a number of patients are lining up for different services. This is around 9:00am in the morning. However, a keen look around the facility reveals absence of the senior workers — the medical superintendent, the administrator and junior cadres, are yet to show up. I am told to wait. Within half an hour, the administrator shows up but she tells me to wait as she attends to the Resident District Commissioner of Bugiri, who had also showed up to check on the facility.The facility is also supposed to have three doctors but only two are available — the third went to Nairobi, Kenya for further studies. However, Nabulime fears that when he completes his studies, he is also likely to look for greener pastures elsewhere. Nabulime has lost count of the number of doctors from Bugiri hospital who enrol for further studies but never return. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629245-bugiri-hospital-suffers-brain-drain.html

Osire Isaac: a light to hopeless children, New vision, Monday February 27th 2012 by Frederick Womakuyu

Little Alistera Alowo lay in pain on her bed, a mat spread on the earthen floor covered by a mosquito net that protected her open wound on the head from the marauding flies. Blood oozed from the wound as flesh also fell from her head. Set in an isolated hut with an open roof to allow in fresh air, a despicable stench fills the room. She looks tired, restless and hungry. Her wound is dirty, her family had been using motor vehicle oil to treat it, since they escaped from Mbale Hospital six months ago over unpaid bills. Unable to afford the cost of medical care, the family dumped Alistera in an isolated hut, treating her with herbs and oil in the hope that the 9-year-old girl will recover. Alistera has had to lose some body parts. Three quarters of her head is rotting and the entire outer skin has fallen off exposing her skull. Her ear was eaten off by an infection and it was buried the day I visited. I visited Alistera recently at her home in Paya sub-county in Tororo district, courtesy of Dr. Isaac Osire, an ordinary but exceptional Ugandan, who has devoted his time and personal resources to help disabled children whose families cannot afford the cost of medical care. Using his own money, the Alistera’s condition, none of them was willing to offer their vehicle to transport her. Read more at http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629269-osire-isaac-a-light-to-hopeless-children.html

Menstruation keeps girls away from school. Newvision Monday February 20th2012 by Godfrey Ojore

Among the hygiene related problems in Katakwi primary schools is lack of pads by the girl child during menstruation.“There is high drop out of girls from school in the district due to lack of sanitary pads for girls,” Damali Asekenye the District Community Development Officer said. She also attributed this problem to lack of knowledge among the parents on how to handle girls when they start their menstruation. She appealed to school administrators to create innovations towards the making of local pads to help girls from poor families. “We shall continue loosing girls from school if we don’t think twice. You need to create avenues of bringing parents on board on this matter,” Asekenye advised. Asekenye was speaking during a one day training of head teachers and teachers from 15 primary schools selected by Water Aid to champion issues of water, hygiene and sanitation The participants agreed to form health clubs in their respective schools to foster issues of sanitation for both school and the community. “I hope to start involving my children to do charity work for the community. The project is very good and I pray it will create great impact among the pupils and teachers,” John Okot the headmaster of Akoboi primary school said.

Nodding: MPs task govt to find cash Daily Monitor Wednesday   February 29th 2012 by Yasin Mugerwa

The government has ordered the Ministry of Health to divert about Shs1b meant for malaria control to help hundreds of children in northern Uganda who are dying from the nodding disease. The revelation made by Junior Health Minister Richard Nduhura in Parliament yesterday, angered legislators across the political spectrum, who accused the government of neglecting thousands of sick children in northern Uganda and went on to reject the minister’s proposal. The diversion of malaria funds came on a day Parliament debated the plight of the sick children in the north in an emotional debate in which lawmakers accused the government of discriminating against the people of northern Uganda, a claim government denied. Realising that there was no money for nodding disease in the supplementary budget to be debated, Rukiga MP Jack Sabiiti moved a motion without notice, for Parliament to compel the government to find money for research and feeding the nodding children through a supplementary within two days.  Ms Cerinah Nebanda proposed an amendment to the motion that no supplementary budget should be passed without that of the nodding disease. Deputy Speaker Jacob Oulanyah, who also represents one of the affected areas, said: “I cannot hold this motion, the issue of nodding disease is an emergency and the motion doesn’t violate any provision of the Constitution. Read more at http://www.monitor.co.ug/News/National/-/688334/1356062/-/axwubvz/-/index.html

Foreigners to get free treatment for HIV, The Sun Wednesday February 29th 2012 By Staff Reporter.

Migrants are currently barred from the service. But ex-Tory cabinet minister Lord Fowler has called for free treatment to be extended to those who have been in Britain for six months.  Foreign students, workers and trafficking victims are among those expected to benefit.  The Department of Health said that safeguards would be introduced to prevent "health tourism". The move comes amid concerns about rising levels of HIV infections and the cost to the NHS of not treating it early. Foreigners are thought not to seek help because it is so costly. Public Health Minister Anne Milton said: "This measure will protect the public and brings HIV treatment into line with all other infectious diseases.”Treating people with HIV means they are very unlikely to pass the infection on to others. "Tough guidance will ensure this measure is not abused." It would bring England into line with Scotland and Wales, where foreigners can already receive free treatment for HIV. Professor Jane Anderson, chairwoman of the British HIV Association, said: "This is good news for people living in the UK who are HIV positive and also for public health in general." Read more at:http://www.thesun.co.uk/sol/homepage/news/4160496/Foreigners-to-get-free-treatment-for-HIV-on-the-NHS.html

Nodding victims in Mulago Sunday Vision Sunday February 4th 2012 by Wokorac Oboi and Raymond Baguma.

Over 25 children suffering from mysterious nodding disease were transferred from Kitgum to Mulago National Referral Hospital. Dr Byarugaba Batera the Executive Director of Mulago said they would be handled as medical investigations continue to be carried out. He said they would take off blood samples, carryout urine tests, as well as CT scan examinations. On Friday the government and the World Health Organisation announced a plan to respond to the disease, which will be coordinated by the office of the prime minister. The plan includes bi annual mass treatment of river blindness, increased surveillance, multivitamin and multi-nutrient supplementation and research into the disease.

Child birth now painful, Sunday Vision Sunday February 4th 2012 by Robert Atuhairwe

76 Kaahwa Adereda a mother of nine and a resident of Kiganda cell of Hoima Municipality says today mothers are told to go with gloves and pay fees, yet back then, all the services were free in the hospitals. It is becoming hard for the poor to have children leading to high infant mortality rate. While Jaon Kiiza 29, a mother of four and a resident of Park cell, Kahoora division says giving birth today is troubling than she saw her mother 20 years ago. Hearing a woman had been operated was rare, unlike today where many deliveries in hospital are by C-section.

Kenyan health sector stares at crisis as nurses retire. Daily Monitor Thurseday February 1st 2012 by Edith Fortunate and Gatonye Gathura

More than 13,000 public nurses are set to retire next year, throwing the already under staffed health regime in major personnel crisis. This will be part of the country wide staff shortage in the civil service of those who will turn 60 years. A similar crisis was shaping in the civil service four years ago, but to buy time, the government raised the retirement age to 60 years from 55 with the first of this bunch expected to retire next year. A national survey on the ages of nurses carried out by the ministry of health found out that  more than 14,000 were over 54 in 2007 and thus are eligible to retire by next year.

Diaspora to raise money for nodding disease Daily Monitor Tuesday February 28th 2012 by Monitor Team

A group of Ugandans living in the UK are planning to raise funds this Saturday to aid research into the nodding disease that has for the past three years baffled the experts. The group said they are dissatisfied with the governments what they termed as lukewarm response to tackling the disease that has killed at least 200 children in Northern Uganda. The organizers said funds will support social care demands faced by families affected by the disease.

American charity equips Manafwa with medical aid, Newvision Monday April 02 2012 by Joseph Wanzusi

Healthcare services in Manafwa district are expected to improve after the district received an assortment of medical supplies worth US $500,000 (about sh1.26b) from Kissito Healthcare International (KHI) an American charity organisation. Handing over the equipment that included a state-of-the-art neonatal incubator, the Kissito USA project manager Clarissa Clarke said the donation is to enhance health care services at Bugobero Health Centre IV and cut down on referral cases from the district. She added that since hiring a doctor and making Bugobero health centre theatre operational in June last year, about 190 general anaesthesia surgeries including many emergency caesarean operations have been carried out thereby contributing to the decrease of maternal and newborn mortality rates in Manafwa district. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630042-American-charity-equips-Manafwa-with-medical-aid.html

CoRSU Hospital Kisubi set to start special surgeries, Newvision Sunday April 01 2012 by Gladys Kalibbala

It is good news for patients who have been flying abroad for special surgeries like hip surgery and knee implants. Now such medical procedures will be handled at the newly opened private ward at CoRSU hospital in Kisubi on the way to Entebbe.  Aloysius Kaganda Bakidde, the president, CoRSU Executive Board explains that since these services will be paid for, the income generated from the private wing will be used in assisting with the surgeries on children with disabilities. He says CoRSU which started operations in 2009 is the only hospital in Uganda currently offering significantly subsidized services to children with physical disability. “We intend to see that people with disability in Uganda are able to access rehabilitation services that improve their quality of life and that they are fully integrated in society,” he explains. Bakidde urged government to come out and address around physical disabilities where he believes 80% of physically disabilities in Uganda that occur in children can be prevented, reduced or cured through timely interventions. “The alternatives of complications that are not curable in the knees or hips are treated by replacing them,” he says.

Last group of nodding disease children discharged Newvision Friday March 29th 2012 by Violet Nabatanzi

The last group of children suffering from nodding disease has been discharged from Mulago national referral hospital. "They are expected to report to the treatment centres for follow up documents before returning to their homes," the hospital's spokesperson Dan Kimosho said. The hospital will continue to work closely with the ministry of health to monitor the affected children but from the established centres. One of the children who had a problem of brain trauma underwent a successful operation, Kimosho confirmed. Before this last group, Mulago had discharged about 20 children who were suffering from the same disease. The screening and treatment centres are in Kitgum, Pader and the other affected districts.  Nodding disease is believed to be a new type of disorder characterized by head-nodding episodes that consist of the repetitive dropping forward of the head.  So far over 3000 children, mainly boys between the ages of five and 15 have been affected with 170 reported dead. The germ which causes river blindness also causes epilepsy in children.   According to research by the World health Organization (WHO) the affected region lies within an area where river blindness is prevalent. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629956-Last-group-of-nodding-disease-children-discharged.html

Sleep for good health looks  Newvision Tuesday March 27th 2012 by Vicky Wandawa

Rose Okot, a general physician at Mulago Hospital, warns that lack of sleep not only makes you look and feel at your worst, but can also lead to ill health.“Adults require at least eight hours of sleep. You can tell when you are not getting enough sleep. Irritability and moodiness are among the first signs.” She warns of less concentration at work. “You may fall into micro sleeps of about five or more seconds during an activity, which may make you seem unprofessional. The need for more sleep is the body’s natural way of alerting us that you do not sleep enough.”Okot says during sleep, the body repairs its cells and also fights infections. She says: “Insufficient sleep, therefore, makes one more susceptible to colds, flu and other infections.” Other signs of insufficient sleep include depression, anxiety, irritability, mood swings, reduced ability to deal with stress, forgetfulness and poor judgment. Until one gets enough sleep, they usually do not realise how much the lack of it has affected them. Clare Nabwiso, an auditor, says it was only when she started getting enough sleep that she realised how restless she had become. “Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629913-Sleep-for-good-health--looks.html

37% Ugandan sex workers are HIV positive Newvision Saturday March 24th 2012 by Joyce Nyakato

New research published in The Lancet, an international medical journal, has revealed that commercial sex workers in Uganda have one of the highest rates of HIV infections in the world. Some 99,878 female sex workers in 50 countries (14 in Asia, four in Eastern Europe, 11 in Latin America and the Caribbean, one in the Middle East and 20 in Africa), were subjects in the study conducted between January 1, 2007 and June 25, 2011. Results of the study, which was led by Dr. Stefan Baral of the US-based John Hopkins School of Public Health, were released on Thursday. The study, which assessed the burden of HIV compared to that of other women of reproductive age, found that the burden is disproportionately high and concluded that there is an urgent need to scale up access to quality HIV prevention programs for sex workers. State minister for ethics and integrity Fr. Simon Lokodo agrees that like all Ugandans, sex workers have a right to HIV treatment and attention. “However, giving them the leeway to operate as a business is too much to ask from the Government,” he said. partners as clients,” Stefan wrote. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629853-37--Ugandan-sex-workers-are-HIV-positive.html

New study shows D.C female condom program highly effective HIV infections Anguilla News by Kiki Kalkstein

Great news! Yesterday, a new study conducted by the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health showed that the female condom program in Washington, D.C., is highly effective in preventing HIV infection. These findings are cause for excitement as they affirm the importance of female condoms in preventing HIV and other STIs and unintended pregnancies in the U.S. and around the world. We know that investing in female condoms is the right thing to do and now we have additional data to continue to make the case for female condoms as a cost effective prevention intervention. These findings are significant for female condom advocates as we continue to face challenges from decision makers regarding the cost effectiveness of female condoms. The analysis concluded that the program, executed through a public-private partnership between the D.C. Department of Health, Female Health Company, and CVS/Caremark, produced significant cost-savings and “prevented enough infections in its first year to save more than $8 million in future medical costs over and above the cost of the program.” The study also showed that the female condom is an excellent public health investment and that provision and promotion of the female condom, especially in high HIV prevalence geographic areas, deserves a place in the HIV prevention toolkit. Read more at: http://www.anguillanews.com/enews/index.php/permalink/4240.html

Vaccine to prevent heart attacks: study DawnCom

A team headed by Prof Prediman Shah from Cedars-Sinai Heart Institute in the United States and Prof Nilsson from Lund University in Sweden, along with a team of other researchers, claim that a vaccine is being developed to prevent heart attacks. Scientists believe that the vaccine could be made available to the public in five years, according to a report published in The Indian Express. The study states that the formation of fatty plaques in blood vessels is one of the main reasons which cause heart attacks. The experiments conducted by a team of scientists prove that it is possible to change the way human immune system reacts to plaques present in the arteries. The experiments also show that the vaccines can reduce the inflammation and severity of the formation of plaques. The team has successfully developed a formula for the vaccine which can reduce the plaque formation by 60 to 70 per cent in mice and the vaccine currently awaits regulatory clearance for clinical trials. Read more at: http://www.dawn.com/2012/04/02/vaccine-to-prevent-heart-attacks-study.html

Over 10 million Ugandans lack access to safe water, New vision Thursday March 22 by Godfrey Ojore

As the world marks World Water Day today, close to a quarter of Uganda’s population lack access to safe water, according to research by Water Aid Uganda.Most of those without access either live in hard-to-reach areas or parts of the country that have been affected by war.Speaking during the launch of Water Aid/EU funded post-conflict project in Soroti, Alice Anukur, the country representative Water Aid Uganda said they are intervening to rescue communities from such places.“The project we are launching has a goal of equitable and sustainable access to safe water, improved sanitation and hygiene for poor communities in post conflict areas of Uganda,.“In Napak, water coverage is at 49% while sanitation is less than 10%. This points to the need for greater emphasis on sanitation improvement in the district with appropriate approaches,” Anukur explained.http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629797-over-10-million-ugandans-lack-access-to-safe-water.html

Pallisa closes eating places. New vision, Wednesday, March 21, 2012. By Lawrence Okwakol.

The Pallisa deputy resident commissioner, Ambrose Onoria, has suspended all eating kiosks and drinking joints in Kabwangasi sub-county. This was after the acting district health officer, Dr. David Okoth, disclosed that there was a cholera outbreak in Doko village, in Kabwangasi sub-county last week.   Dr. Okoth said the first victim got cholera after eating food from a kiosk on Budaka-Mbale Road. The victim was later rushed to Busiu Treatment centre in Mbale district where he was treated and discharged.Four other people from Doko village contracted the disease and were admitted to Namatala Treatment Centre in Mbale Municipality. Dr. Okoth advised people to practise good hygiene like washing hands with clean water after visiting the toilet and drinking boiled water from recommended water sources. He also advised them to avoid eating from roadside kiosks. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629782-pallisa-closes-eating-places.html

Water Aid launches WASH magazine New vision, Thurseday March 22nd 2012 by Agnes Kyotalengerirekyo.

WaterAid Uganda has launched a water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) magazine.  The magazine was launched by water and environment minister, Maria Mutagamba to mark this year’s international Women’s Day at the Media Centre in Kampala. Speaking at the launch, Mutagamba stressed that women and girls had a right to healthy, secure and dignified life. The magazine aims at empowering women and girls through improved access to water, sanitation and hygiene services. It has inspiring stories about issues, challenges women and girls in the East African region face due to lack of access to water. WaterAid’s head of policy, Rebecca Alowo, said easy access to simple facilities and washrooms is important, especially for adolescent girls to stay in school and reach their potential. Alice Anukur, WaterAid’s country representative, said the magazine will be published annually.  Apart from inspiring girls and women, the magazine will also show different ways in which girls and women can access WASH services. Phttp://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629781-wateraid-launches-wash-magazine.htmlublish Date: Mar 21, 2012

HIV Rate Drops in Northern Uganda Daily Monitor Monday March 19th 2012 by Flavia Lanyero

The HIV/Aids prevalence in northern Uganda has significantly dropped from 8.2 per cent to 5.7 per cent despite the hard times the region has been going through. Five years ago, the region now in the recovery process, had one of the highest rates which was blamed on the long-running armed conflict, which forced thousands into internally displaced people’s camps.A preliminary Aids Indicator Survey 2011 released on Friday in Kampala shows that the Mid-North, North-East, East-Central and Kampala had between 5 and 7 per cent prevalence rates. Dr Alex Opio, the lead researcher, who is also the assistant Commissioner for National Disease Control, yesterday said this was a preliminary analysis that did not capture the causes of the drop and increase.It is only mid-eastern and West Nile regions that had less than five percent prevalence. The mid-eastern districts: Kapchorwa, Bukwo, Mbale, Bududa, Manafwa, Tororo, Butaleja, Sironko, Pallisa, Budaka and Busia have 3.7 per cent prevalence. West Nile comprising Moyo, Adjumani, Yumbe, Arua, Koboko,

Bananas key in men’s sexuality, New vision Monday 12th 2012 by Agnes Kyotalengerire

Many people eat bananas simply because they are sweet. But did you know that they are loaded with nutrients? Nutritionists say bananas are rich in potassium, fibre, iron, zinc, sodium, carbohydrates as well as vitamins B6, A, C, B1, B2 and E. Geoffrey Babughirana, a dietician at World Vision, recommends that men, especially, take three small-size bananas or one medium-size bogoya (cavendish) daily. He says the black tiny seeds in the midrib are rich in zinc and Vitamin E, which boost men’s sexual ability, sperm count and sperm speed.  “The potassium and sodium content in bananas regulates the body’s water balance. The more potassium one has, the more fluid there is in the body, hence preventing dehydration,” observes, Alex Mukori, a nutritionist. “For instance, if one has diarrhoea and takes bananas, they help replace the lost fluid.”Bananas are also excellent stress busters, due to their high potassium content, Mukori explains.

District health officer arrested for stealing drugs Newvision Monday March 26th 2012 by Frederick Kiwanuka

The Nakaseke District Health Officer, Dr.Badru Sessimba has been arrested in an ongoing operation by State House to curb misappropriation of funds and theft of drugs in the district’s health department.Sessimba was arrested on Saturday by a team of security personnel from the presidential medical and health service delivery monitoring unit over allegations of financial impropriety and abuse of office.The arrest followed a month of investigations during which the operation team detectives visited several health units in the district.Another male nurse at Nakaseke Hospital, David Sekiranda was nabbed with drugs and medical equipped worth over 30m three months ago.Moses Talemwa, a detective attached to the team, said Sessimba allegedly diverted millions of shillings which were meant for implementing health services in the Nakaseke.Among other allegations, Sessimba is accused of having misappropriated funds which were meant for immunization. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629876-district-health-officer-arrested-for-stealing-drugs.html

37% Ugandan sex workers are HIV positive, Newvision Saturday March 24th 2012 by Joyce Nyakato

New research published in The Lancet, an international medical journal, has revealed that commercial sex workers in Uganda have one of the highest rates of HIV infections in the world. Some 99,878 female sex workers in 50 countries (14 in Asia, four in Eastern Europe, 11 in Latin America and the Caribbean, one in the Middle East and 20 in Africa), were subjects in the study conducted between January 1, 2007 and June 25, 2011. Results of the study, which was led by Dr. Stefan Baral of the US-based John Hopkins School of Public Health, were released on Thursday. The study, which assessed the burden of HIV compared to that of other women of reproductive age, found that the burden is disproportionately high and concluded that there is an urgent need to scale up access to quality HIV prevention programs for sex workers.State minister for ethics and integrity Fr. Simon Lokodo agrees that like all Ugandans, sex workers have a right to HIV treatment and attention.“However, giving them the leeway to operate as a business is too much to ask from the Government,” he said. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629853-37-ugandan-sex-workers-are-hiv-positive.html

320 women in Mbarara screened for cancer Newvision Tuesday March 20th 2012 by Mark Owor

A total of 320 women in Mbarara were on Saturday screened and tested for breast and cervical cancer at Mbarara referral hospital in western Uganda. It follows a partnership cancer awareness campaign between Centenary Bank and Rotary International last year to organize cancer vaccinations, testing, sensitization and referrals to access proper medical facilities.“Last year we launched a three-year anti-cancer initiative campaign in partnership with Rotary International to construct a two-storied cancer ward worth sh330m at St. Francis Hospital Nsambya,” the corporate affairs and communications manager, Allen Ayebare said.“The partnership includes holding of 12 community days spreading across the country during which cancer vaccinations, testing, sensitization and referrals to hospitals will be done as well as enhancing public awareness about early diagnosis and treatment options for cancer,” Ayebare stressed. She explained that only 45% of breast cancer patients and 18% of cervical cancer patients survive five years after diagnosis, which researchers attribute to late diagnosis due to ignorance and lack of technology. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/629734-320-women-in-mbarara-screened-for-cancer.html

TB spreads 29% faster in jail The excess Tribune  Sunday March 25th 2012 by our correspondent

Tuberculosis (TB) spreads 29 per cent faster in jail than it does outside because the country’s prisons are overcrowded and inmates live in close proximity, said Punjab TB Control Programme Director Dr Drakashan Badar at an orientation session for journalists on World TB Day on Saturday.Dr Badar said the closer two people are, the faster the disease travels between them. The close physical proximity of prisoners in overcrowded jails was the reason for the higher rates of TB in prisons than outside, she said.Over 100,000 prisoners have been screened for TB under a Directly Observed Treatment Short-Course (DOTS) linkage programme, she said. “Health is a human right and those who are in jail do not forfeit this right. If inmates are not treated in jail for TB, they can put the general population at risk of the disease when they come out of jail,” she said.

ARVs shortage soars as sh43.9b lies idle, New vision Sunday April 8th 2012 by Conan Businge

While people living with HIV/AIDS were grappling with shortage of anti-retroviral drugs last year, over sh43.9b meant for buying the drugs was lying idle in the government coffers, findings of an audit report have revealed. According to the latest Auditor General’s report released last week, the health ministry had received $24m (about 51.8b) from Global Fund to procure HIV/AIDS drugs. This, according to the report covering the period ending June 2011, was received in two disbursements of $4.2m (about sh8b) in November 2009 and $19.9m (about sh43b) in June 2010.Out of this amount, only sh7.9b (about 15.4%) was spent on procurement of ARVs and paying the program coordinator’s salary, leaving an unutilized balance of sh43.9b. The AG, Peter Nyombi says this reflects low absorption capacity of the project funds, which makes the attainment of the intended objectives within the stated time impossible. However, the report adds that non-utilization of the funds could be due to the delay in the release of the funds from the donors. The report calls for positive action as regards the findings. Read more athttp://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630169-arvs-shortage-soars-as-sh43-9b-lies-idle.html

Girl walks 12km for ARVs Newvision Tuesday April 10th 2012 by Tom Gwebayanga

For the last five months, 17-year-old Martha (not real name) has been a common sight on the Nabirumba-Kamuli road on her way to pick antiretro- viral (ARV) drugs from Kamuli Hospital. Her monthly trek began in December last year after her father, a resident of Nabwigulu sub-county, kicked her out of his home, saying he would not waste his resources on an HIV/ AIDS patient. Left with no choice, Martha left to live with grandfather, 9km farther away from the nearest health facility. This meant that despite her precarious health, she had to walk 12km to pick ARVs. Martha’s plight came to light last Friday at Nabirumba Health Centre III, where Plan, an NGO, organised a function to mark the World Tuberculosis Day. the Kamuli district information officer, Joseph Ngobi, said. Ngobi said Martha’s life was in danger because the grandfather, Nasani Musengawe, was too poor to provide a balanced diet or food supplements for the girl, let alone for him. “She is sickly because of poor feeding. A person on ARVs needs to eat foods that are rich in proteins and carbohydrates,” Ngobi added. “I have lost hope. Much as I get the drugs, I should have a balanced diet, which my grandfather cannot afford,” Martha said. She said she loves matooke, rice, meat, chicken and milk but nobody can offer her such food. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630207-girl-walks-12km-for-arvs.html

Womens height linked to ovarian cancer Newvision Monday April 9th 2012

Taller women have a slightly higher risk of ovarian cancer, according to a review of studies. Obesity is also a risk factor among women who have never taken HRT, say international researchers. Previous studies have suggested a link, but there has been conflicting evidence. The latest research, published in the journal PLoS Medicine, analysed all worldwide data on the topic. It looked at 47 epidemiological studies in 14 countries, including about 25,000 women with ovarian cancer and more than 80,000 women without ovarian cancer. Lead researcher Prof Valerie Beral of the Oxford University Epidemiology Unit told the BBC: "By bringing together the worldwide evidence, it became clear that height is a risk factor." She said there was also a clear relationship between obesity and ovarian cancer in women who had never taken HRT."Ovarian cancer can clearly be added to the list [of cancers linked to obesity]," she added. Sarah Williams, health information officer at Cancer Research UK, said the study produced a clearer picture of the factors that could affect a woman's risk of developing ovarian cancer, and found that body size was important. "Women can reduce their risk of this and many other diseases by keeping to a healthy weight," she said. "For women trying to lose weight, the best method is to eat healthily, eat smaller amounts and be more physically active." Commenting on the study, Dr Paul Pharoah, reader in cancer epidemiology at the University of Cambridge, said the increase in risk was small. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630206-women-s-height-linked-to-ovarian-cancer.html

Hungarian IPU institute donate to Cancer Foundation, New vision Wednesday April 04 2012, by Violet Nabatanzi Uganda Child Cancer Foundation has received 2,000 euros (about sh6.8m) from Hungarian delegation to the ongoing IPU assembly taking place in Kampala. The delegation led by Ambassador Sandor Juhasz handed over the funds to Dr. Jackson Orem; the executive director of Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI). Juhasz said that they want to make the life of suffering children get better. "Uganda is far from Hungary but such humane action will bring us very close to each other," Juhasz said. Orem assured the delegates that he will make sure that the donated fund goes directly to children affected with cancer. "As a foundation we have managed to achieve many instrumental achievements, as I speak now we have some children that managed to overcome the disease through the support of the clinical team from UCI, but we followed them back and we see them going back to school normally," Orem said.  The medical officer UCI, Nixon Niyonzima said the commonest type of cancer in children is Burkitt's lymphoma and on average the institute admits 15 children per month. "Some of the challenges we are faced with is that the fact that the patients come when it is too late, sometimes they go to traditional healers first and wait until the condition gets worse," Niyonzima said.  Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630094-hungarian-ipu-delegates-donate-to-cancer-foundation.html

Sh43.9b lies idle as ARV shortage bites Newvision Monday April 9th 2012 by Canon Businge

While people living with HIV were grappling with shortage of anti-retroviral drugs last year, over sh43.9b meant for buying the drugs was lying idle in the government coffers. According to the latest Auditor General’s report released last week, the health ministry had received $24m (about 51.8b) from Global Fund to procure HIV/AIDS medicines. This, according to the report covering the period ending June 2011, was received in two disbursements of $4.2m (about sh8b) in November 2009 and $19.9m (about sh43b) in June 2010. Out of this amount, only sh7.9b (about 15.4%) was spent on procurement of ARVs and paying the Program Coordinator’s salary leaving unutilised balance of sh43.9b. This, the AG says, reflects low absorption capacity of the project funds, which makes the attainment of the intended objectives within the stated time impossible. However, the report adds that non-utilisation of the funds could be due to the delay in the release of the funds from the donors. The report recommends that the management of the health ministry “should follow up the matter to ensure that there is timely release of the project funds to enable implementation of all agreed activities.” In response to the audit report, the Ministry of Health explained that they had addressed the problem by appointing the National Medical Stores as the procurement agent for pharmaceuticals and health supplies for the public sector. This move was designed to improve funds absorption since most of the money is meant for buying pharmaceuticals and health supplies. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630187-sh43-9b-lies-idle-as-arv-shortage-bites.html

Tuberculosis on the rise in prisons New vision Thursday April 5th 2012 by Petride Mudoola

The medical superintendent at Murchison Bay Hospital Luzira Prisons has advised Government to invest in the management of tuberculosis (TB) in prisons so as to eradicate the disease. Dr Joseph Andama Oluka says TB prevalence in detention facilities is two to five times much higher than the one in the national average, which requires immediate intervention. "Despite the high TB prevalence rate in prisons, interventions to reduce the disease are still minimal.” According to the Prisons medical service, TB prevalence in prisons stands at 10% compared to the 6.4% national prevalence rate. Currently more than 70 prisoners are on TB treatment. Oluka cites congestion in the detention facilities as part of the problem. “The determinacy of infectious diseases like tuberculosis is very prevalent in prisons due to congestion and given the fact that majority of the prisoners are poor and come from disease trodden areas.” Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem in Uganda with an annual incidence of 330 cases of all forms and 136 new smear positive cases per 100,000 people per year according to reports from World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO Global Report released in 2010 ranked Uganda 16th among the 22 TB high burden countries and the expected case load per year is 102,000 people. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630110-tuberculosis-on-the-rise-in-prisons.html

Govt to provide free food to nodding children, says Mbabazi Newvision  Thursday April 5th 2012 by Francis Kagolo

The Government is to supply free food to children in northern Uganda particularly areas worst hit by nodding disease as one of the measures to curb the epidemic Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi has announced. He also declared mass treatment of river blindness in the entire region as the country awaits health experts to discover the cause and best treatment for nodding disease. The area is river blindness endemic. “We are going to supply  food because one of the problems in the area is  lack of  food and  basic vitamins among children. We have so far set up three treatment centres. We want to increase them to at least 10 so that all children can be observed, given food and drugs.”” Mbabazi said. “He revealed this on Wednesday during a meeting with a group of visiting US senators and representatives who came to Uganda courtesy of CARE, a global charity organization working in northern Uganda. The meeting took place at this office in Kampala. The delegation, led by Helene Gayle, the chief executive of CARE USA, and Johnny Isakson, senator of Georgia, wanted to know efforts the Government was undertaking to develop the war-torn northern Uganda. Mbabazi said, save for nodding disease which was posing new challenges, the region was on the right track to total recovery and development, thanks to the Peace Recovery and Development Programme (PRDP). Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630127-govt-to-provide-free-food-to-nodding-children-says-mbabazi.html

Tachoma hits 6,000 in Moroto Newvision Wednesday April 04th 2012 by O.Wanyama

Over 6,000 people have been treated for eye complications at Moroto Hospital over the last three months. The officer in charge of the hospital’s eye clinic, Sister Emily Akullu, said most of the patient’s rare suffering from trachoma that has hit the districts of Napak and Moroto. Trachoma is caused by bacteria known as chlamydia trachomatis. The disease presents with swollen itchy eyes and a yellow discharge from the eyes. The signs of trachoma are usually noticed five to 12 days after exposure to the bacteria.It spreads through poor hygiene and sharing face towels. Akullu told New Vision on Saturday that between 30 to 50 patients are diagnosed with trachoma every day. She said many people suffer from cataracts and other defects that can be managed if treatment starts early. Akullu cautioned residents on the dangers of delayed treatment of trachoma, saying it could cause blindness. She said trachoma can be prevented by improving sanitation, especially among children who are at high at risk of contracting the disease. Akullu said the district health department is using village health teams to sensitise the communities on sanitation and the importance of seeking treatment early. The World Health Organisation says about six million people worldwide are blind due to trachoma and more than 150 million others are in dire need of treatment. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630091-tachoma-hits-6-000-in-moroto.html

Moyo health workers take on tropical diseases New vision Tuesday April 03rd2012  by  Andrew Amvesi The health officials and community leaders in Moyo district have laid strategies to carry out massive campaigns on neglected tropical disease which have affected the local communities in the rural areas.  The move is aimed at fighting neglected tropical diseases such as sleeping sickness, trachoma, elephantiasis and Bilharzias that have affected most communities especially along river banks and near forested areas.  During a sensitization and advocacy meeting that was held at Moyo district headquarters on Friday, the Vector control officer, Nicholas Onwong, said most people in rural areas are at a higher risk of contracting the diseases due to the nature of their settlement. “Majority of us opted to settle along river banks and in forested areas for reasons of easy cultivation without knowing that parasites which transmit tropical neglected diseases also live with us,” Onwong asserted. He urged such community members to visit health units and community based medicine distributors for drugs in an effort to fight tropical neglected diseases in the district.  Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630077-moyo-health-workers-take-on-tropical-diseases.html

American charity equips Manafwa with medical aid Newvision Tuesday April 2nd 2012 by Joseph Wanzusi

Healthcare services in Manafwa district are expected to improve after the district received an assortment of medical supplies worth US $500,000 (about sh1.26b) from Kissito Healthcare International (KHI) an American charity organisation. Handing over the equipment that included a state-of-the-art neonatal incubator, the Kissito USA project manager Clarissa Clarke said the donation is to enhance health care services at Bugobero Health Centre IV and cut down on referral cases from the district. Clarke said her organisation was committed to working in partnership with Manafwa district authorities in up-grading Bugobero health centre to a district hospital.“The equipment donation is part of a comprehensive health sector development plan that covers mother, infant and young child nutrition and malnutrition management, health sector human resource development and maternal health under a public-private partnership,” Clarke said. Clarke said KHI joined hands with Manafwa district in March 2011 to provide supply chain management assistance through donation of drugs and supplies and identified nurses and clinical officers, who were passionate about patient care and provided them with a monetary incentive for their hard work and commitment to patient care at Bugobero health centre. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630042-american-charity-equips-manafwa-with-medical-aid.html

ARVs shortage soars as sh43.9b lies idle, New vision Sunday April 8th 2012 by Conan Businge While people living with HIV/AIDS were grappling with shortage of anti-retroviral drugs last year, over sh43.9b meant for buying the drugs was lying idle in the government coffers, findings of an audit report have revealed. According to the latest Auditor General’s report released last week, the health ministry had received $24m (about 51.8b) from Global Fund to procure HIV/AIDS drugs. This, according to the report covering the period ending June 2011, was received in two disbursements of $4.2m (about sh8b) in November 2009 and $19.9m (about sh43b) in June 2010.Out of this amount, only sh7.9b (about 15.4%) was spent on procurement of ARVs and paying the program coordinator’s salary, leaving an unutilized balance of sh43.9b. The AG, Peter Nyombi says this reflects low absorption capacity of the project funds, which makes the attainment of the intended objectives within the stated time impossible. However, the report adds that non-utilization of the funds could be due to the delay in the release of the funds from the donors. The report calls for positive action as regards the findings. Read more athttp://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630169-arvs-shortage-soars-as-sh43-9b-lies-idle.html

Girl walks 12km for ARVs Newvision Tuesday April 10th 2012 by Tom Gwebayanga

For the last five months, 17-year-old Martha (not real name) has been a common sight on the Nabirumba-Kamuli road on her way to pick antiretro- viral (ARV) drugs from Kamuli Hospital. Her monthly trek began in December last year after her father, a resident of Nabwigulu sub-county, kicked her out of his home, saying he would not waste his resources on an HIV/ AIDS patient. Left with no choice, Martha left to live with grandfather, 9km farther away from the nearest health facility. This meant that despite her precarious health, she had to walk 12km to pick ARVs. Martha’s plight came to light last Friday at Nabirumba Health Centre III, where Plan, an NGO, organised a function to mark the World Tuberculosis Day. the Kamuli district information officer, Joseph Ngobi, said. Ngobi said Martha’s life was in danger because the grandfather, Nasani Musengawe, was too poor to provide a balanced diet or food supplements for the girl, let alone for him. “She is sickly because of poor feeding. A person on ARVs needs to eat foods that are rich in proteins and carbohydrates,” Ngobi added. “I have lost hope. Much as I get the drugs, I should have a balanced diet, which my grandfather cannot afford,” Martha said. She said she loves matooke, rice, meat, chicken and milk but nobody can offer her such food. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630207-girl-walks-12km-for-arvs.html

Womens height linked to ovarian cancer New vision Monday April 9th 2012

Taller women have a slightly higher risk of ovarian cancer, according to a review of studies. Obesity is also a risk factor among women who have never taken HRT, say international researchers. Previous studies have suggested a link, but there has been conflicting evidence. The latest research, published in the journal PLoS Medicine, analysed all worldwide data on the topic. It looked at 47 epidemiological studies in 14 countries, including about 25,000 women with ovarian cancer and more than 80,000 women without ovarian cancer. Lead researcher Prof Valerie Beral of the Oxford University Epidemiology Unit told the BBC: "By bringing together the worldwide evidence, it became clear that height is a risk factor." She said there was also a clear relationship between obesity and ovarian cancer in women who had never taken HRT."Ovarian cancer can clearly be added to the list [of cancers linked to obesity]," she added. Sarah Williams, health information officer at Cancer Research UK, said the study produced a clearer picture of the factors that could affect a woman's risk of developing ovarian cancer, and found that body size was important. "Women can reduce their risk of this and many other diseases by keeping to a healthy weight," she said. "For women trying to lose weight, the best method is to eat healthily, eat smaller amounts and be more physically active." Commenting on the study, Dr Paul Pharoah, reader in cancer epidemiology at the University of Cambridge, said the increase in risk was small. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630206-women-s-height-linked-to-ovarian-cancer.html

Hungarian IPU institute donate to Cancer Foundation, Newvision Wednesday April 04 2012, by Violet Nabatanzi

Uganda Child Cancer Foundation has received 2,000 euros (about sh6.8m) from Hungarian delegation to the ongoing IPU assembly taking place in Kampala. The delegation led by Ambassador Sandor Juhasz handed over the funds to Dr. Jackson Orem; the executive director of Uganda Cancer Institute (UCI). Juhasz said that they want to make the life of suffering children get better. "Uganda is far from Hungary but such humane action will bring us very close to each other," Juhasz said. Orem assured the delegates that he will make sure that the donated fund goes directly to children affected with cancer. "As a foundation we have managed to achieve many instrumental achievements, as I speak now we have some children that managed to overcome the disease through the support of the clinical team from UCI, but we followed them back and we see them going back to school normally," Orem said.  The medical officer UCI, Nixon Niyonzima said the commonest type of cancer in children is Burkitt's lymphoma and on average the institute admits 15 children per month. "Some of the challenges we are faced with is that the fact that the patients come when it is too late, sometimes they go to traditional healers first and wait until the condition gets worse," Niyonzima said.  Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630094-hungarian-ipu-delegates-donate-to-cancer-foundation.html

Sh43.9b lies idle as ARV shortage bites Newvision Monday April 9th 2012 by Canon Businge

While people living with HIV were grappling with shortage of anti-retroviral drugs last year, over sh43.9b meant for buying the drugs was lying idle in the government coffers. According to the latest Auditor General’s report released last week, the health ministry had received $24m (about 51.8b) from Global Fund to procure HIV/AIDS medicines. This, according to the report covering the period ending June 2011, was received in two disbursements of $4.2m (about sh8b) in November 2009 and $19.9m (about sh43b) in June 2010. Out of this amount, only sh7.9b (about 15.4%) was spent on procurement of ARVs and paying the Program Coordinator’s salary leaving unutilised balance of sh43.9b. This, the AG says, reflects low absorption capacity of the project funds, which makes the attainment of the intended objectives within the stated time impossible. However, the report adds that non-utilisation of the funds could be due to the delay in the release of the funds from the donors. The report recommends that the management of the health ministry “should follow up the matter to ensure that there is timely release of the project funds to enable implementation of all agreed activities.” In response to the audit report, the Ministry of Health explained that they had addressed the problem by appointing the National Medical Stores as the procurement agent for pharmaceuticals and health supplies for the public sector. This move was designed to improve funds absorption since most of the money is meant for buying pharmaceuticals and health supplies. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630187-sh43-9b-lies-idle-as-arv-shortage-bites.html

 

Tuberculosis on the rise in prisons New vision Thursday April 5th 2012 by Petride Mudoola

The medical superintendent at Murchison Bay Hospital Luzira Prisons has advised Government to invest in the management of tuberculosis (TB) in prisons so as to eradicate the disease. Dr Joseph Andama Oluka says TB prevalence in detention facilities is two to five times much higher than the one in the national average, which requires immediate intervention. "Despite the high TB prevalence rate in prisons, interventions to reduce the disease are still minimal.” According to the Prisons medical service, TB prevalence in prisons stands at 10% compared to the 6.4% national prevalence rate. Currently more than 70 prisoners are on TB treatment. Oluka cites congestion in the detention facilities as part of the problem. “The determinacy of infectious diseases like tuberculosis is very prevalent in prisons due to congestion and given the fact that majority of the prisoners are poor and come from disease trodden areas.” Tuberculosis remains a major public health problem in Uganda with an annual incidence of 330 cases of all forms and 136 new smear positive cases per 100,000 people per year according to reports from World Health Organization (WHO). The WHO Global Report released in 2010 ranked Uganda 16th among the 22 TB high burden countries and the expected case load per year is 102,000 people. Read more at:http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630110-tuberculosis-on-the-rise-in-prisons.html

Govt to provide free food to nodding children, says Mbabazi Newvision  Thursday April 5th 2012 by Francis Kagolo

The Government is to supply free food to children in northern Uganda particularly areas worst hit by nodding disease as one of the measures to curb the epidemic Prime Minister Amama Mbabazi has announced. He also declared mass treatment of river blindness in the entire region as the country awaits health experts to discover the cause and best treatment for nodding disease. The area is river blindness endemic. “We are going to supply  food because one of the problems in the area is  lack of  food and  basic vitamins among children. We have so far set up three treatment centres. We want to increase them to at least 10 so that all children can be observed, given food and drugs.”” Mbabazi said. “He revealed this on Wednesday during a meeting with a group of visiting US senators and representatives who came to Uganda courtesy of CARE, a global charity organization working in northern Uganda. The meeting took place at this office in Kampala. The delegation, led by Helene Gayle, the chief executive of CARE USA, and Johnny Isakson, senator of Georgia, wanted to know efforts the Government was undertaking to develop the war-torn northern Uganda. Mbabazi said, save for nodding disease which was posing new challenges, the region was on the right track to total recovery and development, thanks to the Peace Recovery and Development Programme (PRDP). Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630127-govt-to-provide-free-food-to-nodding-children-says-mbabazi.html

Tachoma hits 6,000 in Moroto Newvision Wednesday April 04th 2012 by O.Wanyama

Over 6,000 people have been treated for eye complications at Moroto Hospital over the last three months. The officer in charge of the hospital’s eye clinic, Sister Emily Akullu, said most of the patient’s rare suffering from trachoma that has hit the districts of Napak and Moroto. Trachoma is caused by bacteria known as chlamydia trachomatis. The disease presents with swollen itchy eyes and a yellow discharge from the eyes. The signs of trachoma are usually noticed five to 12 days after exposure to the bacteria.It spreads through poor hygiene and sharing face towels. Akullu told New Vision on Saturday that between 30 to 50 patients are diagnosed with trachoma every day. She said many people suffer from cataracts and other defects that can be managed if treatment starts early. Akullu cautioned residents on the dangers of delayed treatment of trachoma, saying it could cause blindness. She said trachoma can be prevented by improving sanitation, especially among children who are at high at risk of contracting the disease. Akullu said the district health department is using village health teams to sensitise the communities on sanitation and the importance of seeking treatment early. The World Health Organisation says about six million people worldwide are blind due to trachoma and more than 150 million others are in dire need of treatment. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630091-tachoma-hits-6-000-in-moroto.html

Moyo health workers take on tropical diseases Newvision Tuesday April 03rd 2012 by  Andrew Amvesi The health officials and community leaders in Moyo district have laid strategies to carry out massive campaigns on neglected tropical disease which have affected the local communities in the rural areas.  The move is aimed at fighting neglected tropical diseases such as sleeping sickness, trachoma, elephantiasis and Bilharzias that have affected most communities especially along river banks and near forested areas.  During a sensitization and advocacy meeting that was held at Moyo district headquarters on Friday, the Vector control officer, Nicholas Onwong, said most people in rural areas are at a higher risk of contracting the diseases due to the nature of their settlement. “Majority of us opted to settle along river banks and in forested areas for reasons of easy cultivation without knowing that parasites which transmit tropical neglected diseases also live with us,” Onwong asserted. He urged such community members to visit health units and community based medicine distributors for drugs in an effort to fight tropical neglected diseases in the district.  Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630077-moyo-health-workers-take-on-tropical-diseases.html

American charity equips Manafwa with medical aid Newvision Tuesday April 2nd 2012 by Joseph Wanzusi

Healthcare services in Manafwa district are expected to improve after the district received an assortment of medical supplies worth US $500,000 (about sh1.26b) from Kissito Healthcare International (KHI) an American charity organisation. Handing over the equipment that included a state-of-the-art neonatal incubator, the Kissito USA project manager Clarissa Clarke said the donation is to enhance health care services at Bugobero Health Centre IV and cut down on referral cases from the district. Clarke said her organisation was committed to working in partnership with Manafwa district authorities in up-grading Bugobero health centre to a district hospital.“The equipment donation is part of a comprehensive health sector development plan that covers mother, infant and young child nutrition and malnutrition management, health sector human resource development and maternal health under a public-private partnership,” Clarke said. Clarke said KHI joined hands with Manafwa district in March 2011 to provide supply chain management assistance through donation of drugs and supplies and identified nurses and clinical officers, who were passionate about patient care and provided them with a monetary incentive for their hard work and commitment to patient care at Bugobero health centre. Read more at: http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/630042-american-charity-equips-manafwa-with-medical-aid.html